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IMPACT OF PUBLIC SUPPORT PAYMENTS, INTENSIVE PSYCHIATRIC COMMUNITY CARE, AND PROGRAM FIDELITY ON EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES FOR PEOPLE WITH SEVERE MENTAL ILLNESS

RESNICK, SANDRA G. Ph.D.1 2; NEALE, MICHAEL S. Ph.D.1; ROSENHECK, ROBERT A. M.D.1 2

Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease: March 2003 - Volume 191 - Issue 3 - pp 139-144
Articles

This study explored the relationship of public support payments, intensive psychiatric community care (IPCC), and fidelity of implementation to 1-year employment outcomes for 520 veterans with severe mental illness (SMI) in a clinical trial of IPCC. At study entry, 455 (87.5%) participants received public support. At 1 year, 46 (8.8%) participants met criteria to be classified as workers. A multivariate analysis indicated that baseline public support was significantly associated with a lower likelihood of employment, and baseline work was positively associated with employment at 1 year. IPCC patients were three times more likely to be working than control subjects, and a significant interaction favored well-implemented IPCC programs over others. This study points out not only the inhibiting effect of public support payment on employment but also the value of IPCC and the special importance of fidelity to program models for employment for people with SMI.

1 VA Connecticut Healthcare System, NEPEC (182), 950 Campbell Avenue, West Haven, Connecticut 06516. Send reprint requests to Dr. Resnick.

2 Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

© 2003 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.