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The Effect of Hospital Electronic Health Record Adoption on Nurse-Assessed Quality of Care and Patient Safety

Kutney-Lee, Ann PhD, RN; Kelly, Deena MS, RN

Journal of Nursing Administration:
doi: 10.1097/NNA.0b013e3182346e4b
Articles
Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of having a basic electronic health record (EHR) on nurse-assessed quality of care, including patient safety. Few large-scale studies have examined how adoption of EHRs may be associated with quality of care. A cross-sectional, secondary analysis of nurse and hospital survey data was conducted. The final sample included 16,352 nurses working in 316 hospitals in 4 states. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between basic EHR adoption and nurse-assessed quality of care outcomes. Nurses working in hospitals with basic EHRs consistently reported that poor patient safety and other quality outcomes occurred less frequently than reported by nurses working in hospitals without an EHR. Our findings suggest that the implementation of a basic EHR may result in improved and more efficient nursing care, better care coordination, and patient safety.

Author Information

Author Affiliations: Assistant Professor (Dr Kutney-Lee), Predoctoral Fellow (Ms Kelly), Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Funding Information/Disclaimers/Disclosures: This project was supported by AHRQ K08-HS-018534 (Kutney-Lee, PI) and NINR R01-NR-004513 (Aiken, PI), T32-NR-007104 (Aiken, PI), and P30-NR005043 (Aiken, PI). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality or the National Institute of Nursing Research. The funding sources had no role in the study design, data collection, analysis, interpretation, or writing of the report.

An earlier version of this article was presented at the Academy Health Annual Research Meeting, June 28, 2010, in Boston, Massachusetts.

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Correspondence: Dr Kutney-Lee, University of Pennsylvania, Claire M. Fagin Hall, 418 Curie Blvd, Room 385, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (akutney@nursing.upenn.edu).

© 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.