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Journal of Nursing Administration:
doi: 10.1097/NNA.0b013e3181e9393b
Articles

The Impact of Environmental Factors on Nursing Stress, Job Satisfaction, and Turnover Intention

Applebaum, Diane DrPH, RN, CIC; Fowler, Susan PhD, RN, CNRN; Fiedler, Nancy PhD, MA; Osinubi, Omowunmi MD, MSc, MBA, FRCA; Robson, Mark PhD, MPH

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Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental factors of odor, noise, light, and color and perceived stress, job satisfaction, and turnover intention.

Background: The physical work environment may positively or negatively influence nurses' stress, and stress may negatively impact their job satisfaction and intention to change jobs.

Methods: The research questions were answered using a descriptive, correlational design. The sample (n = 116) consisted of medical-surgical nurses working in acute-care settings. A 36-item questionnaire addressed odor, noise, light, color, perceived stress, job satisfaction, and turnover intention.

Results: Significant relationships were found between noise and perceived stress, perceived stress and job satisfaction, job satisfaction and turnover intention, and perceived stress and turnover intention.

Conclusions: Nurses tend to overlook their physical environment and "do their job." Common environmental stressors in the work environment can be stressful to staff and influence job satisfaction and, ultimately, intention to change jobs. Mitigating or eliminating these environmental factors has the potential to improve staff satisfaction and retention. Stress influences nursing job satisfaction and, ultimately, intention to change jobs.

© 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

 

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