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Respirable Particles and Carcinogens in the Air of Delaware Hospitality Venues Before and After a Smoking Ban

Repace, James MSc

Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine:
Fast Track Article
Abstract

How do the concentrations of indoor air pollutants known to increase risk of respiratory disease, cancer, heart disease, and stroke change after a smoke-free workplace law? Real-time measurements were made of respirable particle (RSP) air pollution and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPAH), in a casino, six bars, and a pool hall before and after a smoking ban. Secondhand smoke contributed 90% to 95% of the RSP air pollution during smoking, and 85% to 95% of the carcinogenic PPAH, greatly exceeding levels of these contaminants encountered on major truck highways and polluted city streets. This air-quality survey demonstrates conclusively that the health of hospitality workers and patrons is endangered by tobacco smoke pollution. Smoke-free workplace laws eliminate that hazard and provide health protection impossible to achieve through ventilation or air cleaning.

Author Information

Visiting Assistant Clinical Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine.

Address correspondence to: James Repace, MSc., Repace Associates, Inc., 101 Felicia Lane, Bowie MD 20720; E-mail: repace@comcast.net.

©2004The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine