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Remain in WorkWhat Work-Related Factors Are Associated With Sustainable Work Attendance: A General Population-Based Study of Women and Men

Holmgren, Kristina PhD; Löve, Jesper PhD; Mårdby, Ann-Charlotte PhD; Hensing, Gunnel PhD

Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine:
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000096
Original Articles
Abstract

Objective: To analyze if organizational climate and work commitment, demand and control, job strain, social support, and physical demands at work are associated with remain in work (RIW), that is, work attendance without sick leave over 15 days per year.

Methods: This Swedish cross-sectional study was based on 4013 workers (aged 19 to 64 years), randomly selected from a general population. Data were collected (2008) through postal questionnaire and registers.

Results: Fair organizational climate, the combination of fair organizational climate and fair work commitment, high control, and low physical demands were associated with RIW for women and men.

Conclusions: This study adds to the rather scarce research findings on factors that promote RIW by identifying work organizational factors and physical prerequisites as being important. Preventive work to create a healthy work environment could be directed at improving organizational climate and reducing physical demands.

Author Information

From Occupational Therapy (Dr Holmgren), Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, and Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine (Drs Holmgren, Löve, and Hensing), The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden and Sahlgrenska University Hospital (Dr Mårdby), Gothenburg, Sweden (Dr Mårdby).

Address correspondence to: Kristina Holmgren, PhD, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, PO Box 453, SE-405 Göteborg, Sweden (kristina.holmgen@neuro.gu.se).

This study was supported by grant for research from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency.

Authors Holmgren, Löve, Mårdby, and Hensing have no relationships/conditions/circumstances that present potential conflict of interest.

The JOEM editorial board and planners have no financial interest related to this research.

Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine