Skip Navigation LinksHome > August 2013 - Volume 55 - Issue 8 > Pulmonary Health Effects in Gulf War I Service Members Expos...
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine:
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e31829176c7
Original Articles

Pulmonary Health Effects in Gulf War I Service Members Exposed to Depleted Uranium

Hines, Stella E. MD, MSPH; Gucer, Patricia PhD; Kligerman, Seth MD; Breyer, Richard MD; Centeno, Jose PhD; Gaitens, Joanna PhD, MPH/MSN; Oliver, Marc MPH; Engelhardt, Susan MSN; Squibb, Katherine PhD; McDiarmid, Melissa MD, MPH

Collapse Box

Abstract

Objective: In a population of Gulf War I veterans who sustained inhalational exposure to depleted uranium during friendly fire incidents in 1991, we evaluated whether those with high body burdens of uranium were more likely to have pulmonary health abnormalities than those with low body burdens.

Methods: We compared self-reported respiratory symptoms, mean pulmonary function values, and prevalence of low-dose chest computed tomography abnormalities between high and low urine uranium groups.

Results: We found no significant differences in respiratory symptoms, abnormal pulmonary function values, or prevalence of chest computed tomography abnormalities between high and low urine uranium groups. Overall, the cohort's pulmonary function values fell within the expected clinical range.

Conclusions: Our results support previous estimates that the depleted uranium levels inhaled during the 1991 friendly fire incidents likely do not cause long-term adverse pulmonary health effects.

Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

Login

Article Tools

Share