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Effects of Occupational Role Conflict and Emotional Demands on Subsequent Psychological Distress: A 3-Year Follow-Up Study of the General Working Population in Norway

Johannessen, Håkon A. PhD; Tynes, Tore MD, PhD; Sterud, Tom PhD

Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine:
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3182917899
Original Articles
Abstract

Objective: To examine the impact of occupational role conflict and emotional demands on subsequent psychological distress.

Methods: A randomly drawn cohort from the general Norwegian working-age population was followed up for 3 years (n = 12,550; response rate = 67%). Eligible respondents were in paid work during the reference week in 2006 and 2009 or temporarily absent from such work (n = 6,745; response rate = 68%).

Results: In the fully adjusted model, both high role conflict (odds ratios = 1.53; 95% CI = 1.15 to 2.03) and high emotional demands (odds ratios = 1.38; 95% CI = 1.13 to 1.69) were significant predictors of psychological distress. Additional significant predictors were low job control, bullying/harassment, and job insecurity (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Considering all of the evaluated work-related factors, role conflict and emotional demands contributed the most to the population risk of developing psychological distress.

Author Information

From the National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway.

Address correspondence to: Håkon A. Johannessen, PhD, PO Box 8149 Dep, N-0033 Oslo, Norway (hajo@stami.no).

Authors Johannessen, Tynes, and Sterud have no relationships/conditions/circumstances that present potential conflict of interest.

The JOEM editorial board and planners have no financial interest related to this research.

©2013The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine