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Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine:
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e31827943c6
Original Articles

Clinically Significant Weight Gain 1 Year After Occupational Back Injury

Keeney, Benjamin J. PhD; Fulton-Kehoe, Deborah PhD, MPH; Wickizer, Thomas M. PhD; Turner, Judith A. PhD; Chan, Kwun Chuen Gary PhD; Franklin, Gary M. MD, MPH

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Abstract

Objective: To examine the incidence of clinically significant weight gain 1 year after occupational back injury, and risk factors for that gain.

Methods: A cohort of Washington State workers with wage-replacement benefits for back injuries completed baseline and 1-year follow-up telephone interviews. We obtained additional measures from claims and medical records.

Results: Among 1263 workers, 174 (13.8%) reported clinically significant weight gain (≥7%) 1 year after occupational back injury. Women and workers who had more than 180 days on wage replacement at 1 year were twice as likely (adjusted odds ratio = 2.17, 95% confidence interval = 1.54 to 3.07; adjusted odds ratio = 2.40, 95% confidence interval = 1.63 to 3.53, respectively; both P < 0.001) to have clinically significant weight gain.

Conclusions: Women and workers on wage replacement for more than 180 days may be susceptible to clinically significant weight gain after occupational back injury.

©2013The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

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