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Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine:
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3182636e29
Original Articles

Incidence and Cost of Depression After Occupational Injury

Asfaw, Abay PhD; Souza, Kerry PhD

Continued Medical Education
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Abstract

Objectives: We examined if injured workers were more likely than noninjured workers to be treated for depression after an occupational injury and estimated the cost paid by group medical insurance.

Method: Nearly 367,900 injured and noninjured workers were drawn from the 2005 Thomson Reuters MarketScan data. Descriptive, logistic, and two-part model regression analyses were used.

Results: The odds of injured workers being treated for depression within the study period were 45% higher than those of noninjured workers (95% confidence interval, 1.17–1.78). The unconditional average cost of outpatient depression treatment was 63% higher for injured workers than for noninjured workers.

Conclusions: Injured workers were more likely than noninjured workers to suffer from depression during the study period. Consequently, additional costs are incurred for treating injured workers' depression; these costs were not covered by the workers' compensation system.

©2012The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

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