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Further Validation of the Psychological Injury Risk Indicator Scale

Winwood, Peter C. PhD; Peters, Roger PhD; Peters, Martin M Psych; Dollard, Maureen PhD

Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine: April 2012 - Volume 54 - Issue 4 - p 478–484
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3182479f77
Original Articles

Objective: Confirm the Psychological Injury Risk Indicator (PIRI) scale capacity to facilitate routine assessment of psychological health of workers in high-stress environments.

Method: A cross-sectional study compared the PIRI scale scores with two experienced clinical psychologists' assessment of defined psychological injury in 93 participants. A second, longitudinal, study assessed PIRI predictive capacity for emotional exhaustion, physical health, and work engagement in 420 participants over 14 months.

Results: The PIRI scale was shown to (a) determine the degree of psychological injury in participants with high correspondence to a specialist clinical interview; and (b) predict future emotional exhaustion, physical health, and work engagement to a significantly better degree than the 12-item General Health Questionnaire and Kessler-10 measures.

Conclusions: The PIRI scale shows a valuable capacity to provide accurate routine psychological health assessment for at-risk workers in high-strain work environments.

From the School of Psychology, Social Work, and Social Policy (Drs Winwood and Dollard), University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; and HEAS Consulting Psychologists (Dr Peters and Mr Peters), Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.

Address correspondence to: Peter C. Winwood, PhD, School of Psychology, Social Work, and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Magill Campus, St Bernards Road, Magill, South Australia 5703 (Peter.winwood@unisa.edu.au).

Disclosure: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

©2012The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine