Skip Navigation LinksHome > September 2011 - Volume 53 - Issue 9 > Unique Features of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in World Trade Ce...
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine:
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3182305282
ORIGINAL ARTICLES: CME Available for this Article at ACOEM.org

Unique Features of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in World Trade Center Responders With Aerodigestive Disorders

Sunderram, Jag MD; Udasin, Iris MD; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie BA; Ko, Susan BA; Cepeda, Clarimel BPH; Marroccoli, Barbara MD; Perret, Carol MS; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela PhD; Scardella, Anthony MD; Kipen, Howard MD

Continued Medical Education
Collapse Box

Abstract

Objectives: To compare obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in World Trade Center (WTC) responders with aerodigestive disorders and snoring with non-WTC habitual snorers, and to distinguish features of OSA in a subset of responders with worsening of snoring after 9/11 from responders with previous habitual snoring.

Methods: Cross-sectional comparative study of 50 WTC Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program responders with aerodigestive disorders and snoring and 50 nonresponders with snoring. Responders with worsening of snoring after 9/11 were compared with previous habitual snorers.

Results: While there was a strong correlation between body mass index (BMI), weight, and Apnea + Hypopnea Index (r = 0.36, P = 0.001; r = 0.29, P = 0.044) in the nonresponders, no correlation between either BMI or weight and Apnea + Hypopnea Index was found in the responders. Responders with worsening of snoring after 9/11 had a significantly lower BMI than previous habitual snorers.

Conclusion: Mechanisms other than obesity are important in the pathogenesis of OSA in WTC responders with aerodigestive disorders.

©2011The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

Login

Article Tools

Share