Editor-in-Chief: Edelle Field-Fote, PT, PhD
ISSN: 1557-0576
Online ISSN: 1557-0584
Frequency: 4 issues per year
Ranking: Clinical Neurology 63/194
Rehabilitation 5/63
Impact Factor: 2.891
Web Editorial
Exploring the Future of Neurologic Physical Therapy: The Emergence of Technological and Scientific Contributions

Advances in science and technology have fueled both our quest for knowledge and the mechanisms available to obtain and retrieve it. One manifestation derived from these discoveries has been our ability to engage new ways of exploring our nervous system. This engagement has been pursued by many physical therapists and their scientific colleagues through the development of the Frontiers in Rehabilitation Science and Technology initiative, briefly discussed previously in this journal. This special issue exposes us to some of these discoveries and advances. As neurologic physical therapists who are dedicated to improving the care of our patients through the assimilation of information and with it, revelations from new procedures to unmask the potential within our dynamic nervous system, we are inevitably faced with 2 options—absorb or abhor. We can embrace some of the new technologies and genomic discoveries while asking ourselves some leading questions upon which to reflect. Will I ever be actively using these procedures? Might I be collaborating in a team effort to implement them with other scientists or professionals? What knowledge do I need to acquire that I did not receive in my formal education or supplemental courses/workshops? How will the discoveries extracted from these presentations impact future practice? Alternatively, one might conclude that this information is irrelevant and has no bearing on what one does or will do and has no place in neurologic physical therapy. We can only hope that the blinders symbolically defining this attitude no longer have a place in our profession.

Read the full editorial by special issue guest editor Dr. Wolf in this special issue.
About this Issue
Dear Reader,

The January special issue topic of The Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy edited by guest editor Dr. Steven L. Wolf, PT, PhD, FAPTA on Technology in Neurological Physical Therapy is now available. This issue has 3 research articles and 3 special interest articles. In a proof of concept study, Vuckovic and colleagues examined a functional electrical stimulation system controlled by a brain computer interface to improve hand function in people with tetraplegia. In a randomized cross over study, Goh and colleagues explored the impact of two types of noninvasive brain stimulation on corticospinal excitability in people with chronic stroke. Gomes-Osman and Field-Fote examined the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with repetitive task practice on hand function and corticomotor excitability in people with tetraplegia. Stewart and Flach provide a clinical point of view on the study by Gomes-Osman and Field Fote. In a special interest article, Stoykov and Madhavan discuss motor priming as a possible way to facilitate motor learning. Borich and colleagues discuss the applications of electroencephalography to characterize brain activity in stroke. Goldberg and colleagues provide an overview of the genomic basis for neurorehabilitation.

The Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy would like to extend a special thank you to retiring associate editor Lara Boyd, PT, PhD. Dr. Boyd is the Canada Research Chair in Neurobiology of Motor Learning, a Michael Smith Foundation for Health Career Investigator, and a Peter Wall Scholar; adding to these responsibilities she has been asked to serve as Advisor to the Vice President of Research at the University of British Columbia and will be overseeing the university's health-related research. Dr. Boyd has also given many years in service to the Neurology Section, including a term as Chair of the Stroke Special Interest Group (2005-2008). We will greatly miss the outstanding contributions she has made in the role of Associate Editor since 2006. We will very much miss her discerning opinions and perceptive insights, but we know that she will continue to be an important member of our JNPT community.

The Editors are pleased to welcome Teresa Jacobson Kimberley, PT, PhD, as a new Associate Editor. Dr. Kimberley is the immediate past Director of Research for the Neurology Section. Dr Kimberley has made outstanding contributions to JNPT as an author, reviewer, and Editorial Board Member. She was the first author of the JNPT article that received the Golden Synapse Award in 2009 and is currently the principal investigator of an NIH-funded study using transcranial magnetic stimulation to understand the pathophysiology of dystonia. In addition to her expertise in non-invasive brain stimulation, Dr. Kimberley brings knowledge in the areas of functional MRI, EMG, and kinematic analysis. We appreciate the value she has placed on JNPT as evidenced by her past contributions and look forward to working with her on the editorial team.

Complementing the technology aspect of this special issue, JNPT reviews three apps for neurological physical therapy clinical practice and education: aVOR, Metronome, and iGotBalance.

A preliminary listing of the Neurology Section programming for the upcoming Combined Sections Meeting is also in this issue. The platform and poster abstracts for CSM are available at www.JNPT.org


George Fulk, PT, PhD
Digital Media Editor
www.JNPT.org
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Call for Manuscripts: Implementation Science/Knowledge Translation

JNPT invites original research articles for a special issue on Implementation Science/Knowledge Translation in Neurologic Physical Therapy. This special issue, scheduled for publication in January 2016, will feature knowledge translation research/implementation science to improve the integration of research knowledge. Prospective authors are encouraged to contact the Special Issue Editors: Vanessa Noonan (vnoonan@rickhanseninstitute.org) or Jennifer Moore (jmoore@ric.org)regarding their submission. Please see the "Call for Manuscripts" page for more information.

Call For Manuscripts | Submit a Manuscript

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Featured Video Abstract

Improvements in Hand Function in Adults With Chronic Tetraplegia Following a Multiday 10-Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Intervention Combined With Repetitive Task Practice

Watch the video abstract from Joyce Gomes-Osman, PT, PhD as she gives an overview of her "Editor's Pick" article.

For the complete collection of video abstracts, visit the Video Gallery.

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Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
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Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
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