Editor-in-Chief: Edelle Field-Fote, PT, PhD
ISSN: 1557-0576
Online ISSN: 1557-0584
Frequency: 4 issues per year
Ranking: Clinical Neurology 62/194
Rehabilitation 5/63
Impact Factor: 2.891
Web Editorial
Lost in Translation: Priorities in the Application of Evidence to Practice

Edelle (Edee) Field-Fote, PT, PhD, FAPTA

Editor-in-Chief

[The following is an excerpt from the editorial that appears in print in the April 2015 issue of JNPT]

…In efforts to define and promote best clinical practice, there is a justifiable emphasis on the research literature and on knowledge translation. When “knowledge translation” is applied to physical therapist practice, most commonly the reference is to interpreting the meaning of the research findings in the context of the real-world clinical setting. However, this represents but one of several forms of knowledge translation. The focus on translating the latest findings to practice seems to belie the point that that most advances in practice are rather incremental and that real differences between alternative forms of intervention are usually small. Numerous large clinical trials have shown that by-and-large conventional physical therapy approaches are as effective as the new-fangled experimental approaches.

Far from being a reason to lament a “negative’ result, neurorehabilitation studies showing that more conventional neurorehabilitation interventions are nearly as effective, or as effective, as the experimental interventions are an endorsement of the value of our conventional physical therapy interventions. Is the limited translation of research to physical therapist practice the principal concern when discussing translation of evidence to practice? I believe that the real concern is that the excellent conventional physical therapy as used in clinical trials is often not “usual practice” in the sense that it often does not represent the way all physical therapists practice; in truth the conventional intervention more often represents an evidence-based approach that characterizes the way exceptional physical therapists practice -- it represents best clinical practice. This suggests there may be value in rethinking what we wish to translate to the clinic – that the best way to ensure the largest number of patients are receiving the best possible care is not by focusing on the next big thing, but instead by consolidating efforts to help all physical therapists provide the best possible “conventional” physical therapy….
About this Issue
Dear Reader,

The April issue of The Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy has 4 research articles, 2 case studies and a Clinical Point of View. Dibble and colleagues examine the effect of resistance training and medication on muscle strength, mobility, and health status in people with Parkinson Disease. Wilhelm and King provide a clinical point of view discussion and interpretation of this study. Carey and colleagues examine the impact of different locomotor training intensities in people with chronic stroke. In a cross sectional study, Sandroff and colleagues examine the associations among physical activity, aerobic capacity, and walking performance in persons with MS and healthy controls. Using body worn sensors, Urbin and colleagues identify the acceleration characteristics that have a stable association with upper extremity function and sensitivity to within-participant fluctuations in function over multiple sessions of task-specific training. Scheets and colleagues describe the physical therapy management of a patient with backward disequilibrium. Lathan and colleagues describe the use of a treadmill with a pressure controlled, sealed chamber that can counter act the effects of gravity during locomotor training on the treadmill in a patient with a stroke.

Be sure to check out author video abstracts to hear directly from the authors about their work.

JNPT is pleased to publish the 4 most outstanding abstracts presented at the 3rd Brazilian Congress of Neurofunctional Physical Therapy held in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, October 17 to 19, 2014

Congratulations to Beth Smith, Jesse Jacobs, and Fay Horak. Their article entitled "Effects of Amplitude Cueing on Postural Responses and Preparatory Cortical Activity of People with Parkinson Disease" published in the October issue won the Golden Synapse award for 2014.

JNPT also sends out special congratulations to our editor-in-chief, Dr. Edelle Field-Fote, for receiving the Neurology Section’s Excellence in Research Award at the Combined Sections Meeting in February.

JNPT would like to extend a special thank you to all of our Editorial Board members and reviewers for their outstanding contributions through the review process for the journal.

George Fulk, PT, PhD
Digital Media Editor
www.JNPT.org
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Call for Manuscripts: Implementation Science/Knowledge Translation

JNPT invites original research articles for a special issue on Implementation Science/Knowledge Translation in Neurologic Physical Therapy. This special issue, scheduled for publication in January 2016, will feature knowledge translation research/implementation science to improve the integration of research knowledge. Prospective authors are encouraged to contact the Special Issue Editors: Vanessa Noonan (vnoonan@rickhanseninstitute.org) or Jennifer Moore (jmoore@ric.org)regarding their submission. Please see the "Call for Manuscripts" page for more information.

Call For Manuscripts | Submit a Manuscript

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Featured Video Abstract

Improvements in Hand Function in Adults With Chronic Tetraplegia Following a Multiday 10-Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Intervention Combined With Repetitive Task Practice

Watch the video abstract from Joyce Gomes-Osman, PT, PhD as she gives an overview of her "Editor's Pick" article.

For the complete collection of video abstracts, visit the Video Gallery.

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