Editor-in-Chief: Edelle Field-Fote, PT, PhD
ISSN: 1557-0576
Online ISSN: 1557-0584
Frequency: 4 issues per year
Ranking: Clinical Neurology 63/194
Rehabilitation 5/63
Impact Factor: 2.891
Web Editorial
Jumping Off the Activity-based Therapy Bandwagon

…The terms we use to describe our practice, have implications for how those outside our profession view us and our practice. The role of the physical therapist when working with a patient to restore ability to perform functional movement, is to decide on the relevant tasks (or components of task) for the patient to practice. This decision is informed by a wealth of knowledge: expertise in pathokinesiology; the ability to evaluate impairment, functional limitations, and participation restrictions; understanding of current motor learning literature; development of a schedule incorporating blocked or random practice; appropriate instruction/education; emphasis on intrinsic feedback and well-timed explicit feedback; and concrete goals that incorporate the patient’s own goals and lifestyle. To lump the end result of this knowledge and expertise into the ball-of-wax term activity-based therapy dishonors the work of decades of physical therapists -- expert clinicians who have spent years developing their skills, researchers who have contributed to the motor learning literature, and leaders who have fought for recognition of the unique contributions of our profession. We have a responsibility to name our efforts so that it is clear what we do, and to claim our contributions to take credit where credit is due.


Edelle (Edee) Field-Fote, PT, PhD, FAPTA

Editor-in-Chief
About this Issue
Dear Reader,

The October issue of The Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy has 6 research articles. Smith and colleagues provided cues to people with Parkinson Disease to focus on increasing movement amplitude during anticipated postural perturbations and examined the impact on postural responses and cortical activity. In a pilot study, Subramaniam and colleagues examined the impact of a dual task training intervention pairing balance training using a Wii balance board with cognitive tasks in people with chronic stroke. Kafri and colleagues compared metabolic cost and energy expenditure between people with chronic stroke and able-bodied individuals when performing common motor activities. Haas and colleagues describe the clinically meaningful difference in gait speed in people with Parkinson Disease. Verheyden and colleagues examined the relationship between postural alignment and clinical measures of body structure/function, activity and participation in people with stroke. In a pilot study, Dorfman and colleagues examined the impact of dual task training pairing treadmill training with cognitive tasks on cognitive and motor performance in older adults with a history of multiple falls.

The Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy received an Impact Factor for 2013 of 2.891 from the Journal of Citations Reports by Thompson Reuters. This is a 76% increase from our impact factor in 2012. With this impact factor JNPT is ranked 5th among rehabilitation journals and 62nd among Clinical Neurology journals. The Impact Factor is currently the most widely used of several approaches to quantifying the impact of a journal on its field of study.

For many years, the Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy (JNPT) has been your resource for the dissemination of research-based evidence related to neurologic physical therapy. As we look to maintain our high standards as a professional resource, we would like to know a little more about you and your preferences related to the journal. Here is a link to a survey, which should take less than 10 minutes to complete.

All of your responses will be kept anonymous and only looked at in the aggregate of your peers and colleagues. Please remember to include your name and e-mail address at the end of the survey to be entered to win an Apple iPad Mini. Your contact information will only be used to contact you if you are a winner.

George Fulk, PT, PhD
Digital Media Editor
www.JNPT.org
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Call for Manuscripts: Implementation Science/Knowledge Translation

JNPT invites original research articles for a special issue on Implementation Science/Knowledge Translation in Neurologic Physical Therapy. This special issue, scheduled for publication in January 2016, will feature knowledge translation research/implementation science to improve the integration of research knowledge. Prospective authors are encouraged to contact the Special Issue Editors: Vanessa Noonan (vnoonan@rickhanseninstitute.org) or Jennifer Moore (jmoore@ric.org)regarding their submission. Please see the "Call for Manuscripts" page for more information.

Call For Manuscripts | Submit a Manuscript

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Winstein et al. Infusing Motor Learning Research Into Neurorehabilitation Practice: A Historical Perspective With Case Exemplar From the Accelerated Skill Acquisition Program

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