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About this Issue
Dear Reader,

The October issue of The Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy has 6 research articles. Smith and colleagues provided cues to people with Parkinson Disease to focus on increasing movement amplitude during anticipated postural perturbations and examined the impact on postural responses and cortical activity. In a pilot study, Subramaniam and colleagues examined the impact of a dual task training intervention pairing balance training using a Wii balance board with cognitive tasks in people with chronic stroke. Kafri and colleagues compared metabolic cost and energy expenditure between people with chronic stroke and able-bodied individuals when performing common motor activities. Haas and colleagues describe the clinically meaningful difference in gait speed in people with Parkinson Disease. Verheyden and colleagues examined the relationship between postural alignment and clinical measures of body structure/function, activity and participation in people with stroke. In a pilot study, Dorfman and colleagues examined the impact of dual task training pairing treadmill training with cognitive tasks on cognitive and motor performance in older adults with a history of multiple falls.

The Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy received an Impact Factor for 2013 of 2.891 from the Journal of Citations Reports by Thompson Reuters. This is a 76% increase from our impact factor in 2012. With this impact factor JNPT is ranked 5th among rehabilitation journals and 62nd among Clinical Neurology journals. The Impact Factor is currently the most widely used of several approaches to quantifying the impact of a journal on its field of study.

For many years, the Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy (JNPT) has been your resource for the dissemination of research-based evidence related to neurologic physical therapy. As we look to maintain our high standards as a professional resource, we would like to know a little more about you and your preferences related to the journal. Here is a link to a survey, which should take less than 10 minutes to complete.

All of your responses will be kept anonymous and only looked at in the aggregate of your peers and colleagues. Please remember to include your name and e-mail address at the end of the survey to be entered to win an Apple iPad Mini. Your contact information will only be used to contact you if you are a winner.

George Fulk, PT, PhD
Digital Media Editor
www.JNPT.org
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Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
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