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pp: 149-203
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About this Issue
Dear Reader,

The Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy is excited to publish our July special issue on motor learning edited by Associate Editor Catherine Lang, PT, PhD; Editorial Board Member Beth Fisher, PT, PhD, FAPTA; and Susanne Morton, PT, PhD. The formation of an important partnership began almost 25 years ago between the fields of neurologic rehabilitation and motor learning. Translating principles of motor learning to clinical populations has informed the interventions we choose and how we deliver them. Our expanded knowledge of motor learning has made physical therapists mindful of ways to set up practice to promote motor learning in individuals with neuropathology.

In the current issue, 5 articles represent different stages of work along the spectrum of translational motor learning research. Borich and colleagues show us that the changes in motor behavior associated with short-term motor learning in individuals with chronic stroke are related to measures of corticospinal tract integrity, suggesting that learning capacity may be linked to the functioning of specific brain pathways. Siengsukon and Al-Sharman demonstrate that sleep is likely an important contributor to consolidation, which is a time-dependent process in which a motor behavior becomes relatively more permanent. Vasudevan and colleagues show that the capability of individuals with traumatic brain injury to perform a short-term locomotor adaptation on a split-belt treadmill is altered, but in a way that is distinct from other patient types, such as patients with cerebral stroke or cerebellar damage. In a case study from Kesar and colleagues, motor learning-driven changes in functional performance poststroke are compared longitudinally within and between sessions. Finally, Winstein and colleagues provide a timely historical review of motor learning research and the motivation for and clinical examples of a novel approach to clinical care, featuring patient-centered motor learning principles.

JNPT would also like to congratulate members of our editorial board for awards they received at the recent APTA NEXT conference. Associate Editor Kathy Gill-Body, PT, MS, NCS, FAPTA and Editorial Board Member Beth Fisher, PT, PhD, FAPTA were both selected as Catherine Worthingham Fellows. The FAPTA designation is the highest honor among APTA's membership categories. Editorial Board Member Sandy Billinger, PT, PhD, FAHA received the Margaret L. Moore Award for Outstanding New Academic Faculty Member.

George Fulk, PT, PhD
Digital Media Editor
www.JNPT.org
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Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
Feedback is an essential component of motor learning. What type of feedback do you most commonly use in the clinic to promote motor learning? Check all that apply.
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