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Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy:
doi: 10.1097/NPT.0b013e318238e145
Section News & Notes

Combined Sections Meeting Neurology SectionPoster Presentations: (NOTE: abstracts are available on-line at www.JNPT.org )

Free Access

A SURVEY OF PRIMARY CARE FALL PREVENTION PRACTICE FOR OLDER ADULTS. L. Allison1, J. Painter2

1. Physical Therapy, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; 2. Occupational Therapy, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC.

PATTERN OF NYSTAGMUS PREDICTS SUCCESSFUL OUTCOME OF CANALITH REPOSITIONING PROCEDURE: A CASE REPORT. J. O. Helminski1

1. Physical Therapy Program, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL.

BRIEF CLINICAL TESTS PREDICT 2-YEAR DECLINE IN ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING IN EARLY-STAGE AD. E. D. Vidoni1, S. Billinger2, J. M. Burns1

1. Neurology, Univ. of Kansas Med Center, Kansas City, KS: 2. University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS.

FACIAL REHABILITATION IN A PATIENT WITH NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE II FOLLOWING FACIAL REANIMATION. C. P. Norton1

1. Physical Therapy, Pi Beta Phi Rehabilitation Institute At Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Nashville, TN.

QUANTIFICATION OF THE FLEXION AND EXTENSION SYNERGIES AT THE WRIST AND FINGERS OF INDIVIDUALS WITH CHRONIC HEMIPARETIC STROKE. L. Miller2, J. P. Dewald1

1. Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL: 2. Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.

SUCCESSFUL IMPLEMENTATION OF A MODIFIED TREATMENT PROTOCOL FOR AN INDIVIDUAL WITH SPINOCEREBELLAR ATAXIA: A CASE REPORT. L. J. Haack1

1. Pi Beta Phi Rehabilitation Institute, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

COMPARISON OF ACUTE REHABILITATION OUTCOMES IN STROKE SURVIVORS BEFORE AND AFTER IMPLEMENTATION OF A CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR WALKING RECOVERY. A. M. Devers1, M. Banta1, A. Chan1, J. Vaught1, M. Wilks1

1. Inpatient Rehabilitation, Sheltering Arms Physical Rehabilitation Centers, Mechanicsville, VA.

THE SCALE FOR THE ASSESSMENT AND RATING OF ATAXIA GAIT SUB-SCALE IS A VALID MEASURE OF GAIT AND DYNAMIC BALANCE IN PERSONS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. E. C. Held Bradford1, R. T. Naismith2, J. M. Wagner1

1. Program in Physical Therapy, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO; 2. Department of Neurology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO.

WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AS A CONDITIONING INTERVENTION PRIOR TO LOCOMOTOR TRAINING IN INDIVIDUALS WITH INCOMPLETE SPINAL CORD INJURY. J. Fenton1, A. Foster1, A. Mills1, K. Taylor1, E. C. Field-Fote2

1. Physical Therapy, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL; 2. The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL.

DEVELOPMENT OF EVIDENCE-BASED DECISION MAKING ALGORITHMS FOR BALANCE AND GAIT OUTCOME MEASURES. C. L. Szot1, E. Tseng1, J. Seale2, A. L. de Joya1

1. Neurologic Physical Therapy Residency Program, TIRR Memorial Hermann, Houston, TX; 2. Physical Therapy, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX.

IS THE RELATIONSHIP OF PERFORMANCE-BASED MEASURES WITH SELF-REPORT MEASURES IN PERSONS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS DEPENDENT ON LEVEL OF CLINICAL DISABILITY? J. M. Wagner1, R. A. Norris1, R. T. Naismith2

1. Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO; 2. Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

INTENSIVE TASK SPECIFIC LOCOMOTOR TRAINING: INTENSITY VERSUS AMOUNT OF PRACTICE. K. R. Nance1

1. Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

TASK PRIORITIZATION DURING DUAL-TASK WALKING IN PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE: TESTING THE “POSTURE SECOND” HYPOTHESIS. V. E. Kelly1, A. J. Eusterbrock1, A. Shumway-Cook1

1. Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ Washington, Seattle, WA.

PREDICTORS OF SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR IN PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON DISEASE. C. Swank1, M. Peiser2, R. Zimmerman2, A. Medley2, M. Thompson2, E. Trudelle-Jackson2

1. Baylor Institute for Rehabilitation, Dallas, TX; 2. Texas Woman's University, Dallas, TX.

COMPARISON OF SHORT-BURSTS OF BODY WEIGHT SUPPORTED TREADMILL TRAINING AND OVERGROUND WALKING TRAINING ON GAIT SYMMETRY IN PERSONS WITH CHRONIC STROKE. S. A. Combs1, A. Kalpathi Parameswaran1, T. Poole1, A. Harmeyer1, D. Colburn1, L. Brower1, A. A. Schmid2

1. Krannert School of Physical Therapy, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN; 2. Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN.

HOME DISCHARGE FROM INPATIENT REHABILITATION WITH A PERONEAL FUNCTIONAL ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ORTHOSIS POST-STROKE. P. Boyne1, E. Patton Wasik1, K. Fisher2, K. McBride3, K. Dunning2

1. Drake Center, Cincinnati, OH; 2. University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH; 3. Bioness, Valencia, CA.

EVALUATION OF AN MS EDUCATIONAL TRACK FOR PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENTS. A. Rosenberg1, D. Meyer2, C. M. Eicher1, A. Fay1, E. Byrne Gaskins4, K. Gore1, M. Mahon1, K. Thomas1, K. Gooch3, L. Johnston1

1. Physical Therapy, UNC-Chapel Hill, Cary, NC; 2. Physical Therapy, UNC Hospitals, Chapel Hill, NC; 3. Eastern Chapter, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Raleigh, NC.

FLEXOR CARPI RADIALIS H-REFLEX INHIBITION CORRELATES WITH IMPAIRED GRIP STRENGTH POST-STROKE. C. P. Phadke1, C. T. Robertson2, E. G. Condliffe3, C. Patten4

1. Spasticity Research Program, West Park Healthcare Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2. Sport and Exercise, Jacksonville University, Jacksonville, FL; 3. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Alberta; 4. Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall VAMC, Gainesville, FL.

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERSONAL FACTORS AND BEHAVIORAL OUTCOMES AFTER LOCOMOTOR REHABILITATION INTERVENTION POST-STROKE. A. E. Embry1, M. G. Bowden2, C. M. Gregory2, A. L. Behrman3, R. R. Neptune4

1. Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC; 2. Veterans Affairs, Ralph H. Johnson Medical Center, Charleston, SC; 3. Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

QUANTIFICATION OF GAIT PERFORMANCE IN PEOPLE WITH FRIEDREICH ATAXIA. J. Stephenson1, S. Kim1, T. Zesiewicz2

1. School of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; 2. Department of Neurology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL.

INTENSIVE LOCOMOTOR TRAINING AND CHANGES IN NON-LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY IN TWO INDIVIDUALS POST STROKE. D. Straube1, T. Hornby1, C. Kinnaird2, C. Holleran2, A. Echauz2, E. Wagner2, K. Rodriguez2, E. Narducci2

1. Physical Therapy, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, IL; 2. Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

SLEEP PARAMETERS ASSOCIATED WITH OFF-LINE LEARNING IN INDIVIDUALS WITH STROKE: A PRELIMINARY REPORT. C. F. Siengsukon1, A. J. Sharman1, S. Stevens2

1. Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS; 2. Neurology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS.

DETERMINING CLINICALLY IMPORTANT DIFFERENCE ON THE TINETTI PERFORMANCE MOBILITY ASSESSMENT (POMA) IN PEOPLE WITH STROKE. J. Canbek1, G. D. Fulk1, L. Nof1, J. L. Echternach1

1. Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL.

HOME BALANCE EXERCISES FOR LOCOMOTOR AND BALANCE PERFORMANCE IN ADULTS WITH CEREBELLAR ATAXIA: A PILOT STUDY. J. L. Keller1, A. Bastian2

1. Motion Analysis Lab, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD; 2. Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

PREDICTING FUNCTIONAL RECOVERY IN PERSONS WITH CHRONIC STROKE USING NAVIGATED TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION. K. Dunning1, S. Israel2, V. Hill1, P. Boyne3, J. Wilkerson3, E. Schaefer1, K. Fisher3, C. Spinner1, J. Laine4, J. Karhu5, B. Kissela6, S. Page1

1. Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH; 2. Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH; 3. Drake Center, Cincinnati, OH; 4. Nexstim Ltd, Helsinki, Finland; 5. University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland; 6. Department of Neurology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.

EFFECTS OF VENTRICULOPERITONEAL SHUNT ON GAIT PERFORMANCE IN PEOPLE WITH NORMAL PRESSURE HYDROCEPHALUS. S. Kim1, J. B. Stephenson1, S. Agazzi2, N. Abel2

1. School of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; 2. Department of Neurosurgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL.

POWER VERSUS MANUAL? WHEELCHAIR INTERVENTION TRENDS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH LOW LEVEL TETRAPLEGIA: FINDINGS FROM THE SCI REHAB STUDY. J. LaBarbera1, A. Natale2, J. Gassaway3

1. Carolinas Rehabilitation, Charlotte, NC; 2. Craig Hospital, Englewood, CO; 3. Institute for Clinical Outcomes Research, Salt Lake City, UT.

IN-PHASE AND ANTI-PHASIC POSTURAL COORDINATION MODES DURING SENSORY RE-WEIGHTING CONDITIONS. G. Antal1, L. Allison1, D. Williams1

1. Physical Therapy, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC.

PREDICTING DISCHARGE PLACEMENT AFTER REHABILITATION FOR A STROKE: THE ROLE OF DEMOGRAPHICS AND CLINICAL PRESENTATION. P. Pohl2, S. Billinger1, A. A. Lentz1, B. J. Gajewski1

1. KUMC, Kansas City, KS: 2. The Sage Colleges, Troy, NY.

COMMUNITY WALKING IS SIMILAR IN HEALTHY OLDER ADULTS AND PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE. J. S. Delavan1, B. P. Simonsen1, R. Xia1, A. J. Threlkeld1, D. Powell1

1. Physical Therapy, Creighton University, Omaha, NE.

GROSS MOTOR COORDINATION PATTERNS DIFFER BETWEEN SEATED AND STANDING CYCLING. N. Carlson1, J. Karlson1, B. Lemon1, J. Rolf1, A. Schleeper1, B. Stoppel1, D. L. Hoover1

1. Rockhurst University, Kansas City, MO.

CAN CHANGES IN HAND POSITION FAVORABLY ALTER SHOULDER KINEMATICS DURING CIRCUIT RESISTANCE TRAINING IN INDIVIDUALS WITH PARAPLEGIA? L. M. Riek1, P. M. Ludewig3, J. Tome2, D. A. Nawoczenski2

1. University of Rochester, Rochester, NY; 2. Ithaca College, Rochester, NY; 3. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

MECHANICAL AND NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF FATIGUE IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE. D. Powell1, A. Benes1, M. Konor1, N. J. Hanson2, K. L. Kerschen1, A. Gustafson1, R. Xia1, A. J. Threlkeld1

1. Physical Therapy, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; 2. College of Education and Human Ecology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

LOWER EXTREMITY WEAKNESS BETTER PREDICTS WALKING LIMITATIONS IN PEOPLE WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS THAN LOWER EXTREMITY STRENGTH ASYMMETRY. A. C. Tigges1, R. T. Naismith2, J. M. Wagner1

1. Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO; 2. Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

REHABILITATION OF THE UPPER LIMB POST STROKE: RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED PILOT INVESTIGATION EVALUATING EXTERNAL AUDITORY FEEDBACK FOR TRUNK CONTROL DURING TWO NEW TRAINING METHODS. G. T. Thielman1, P. Bonsall2

1. Physical Therapy, University of the Sciences, Philadelphia, PA; 2. Physical Therapy, University of the Sciences, Philadelphia, PA.

MANUAL WHEELCHAIR WHEELIE TRAINING BY PHYSICAL THERAPISTS IN INPATIENT SPINAL CORD INJURY REHABILITATION. K. M. Casperson1, L. M. Teeter1

1. Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA.

QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF PARKINSON'S RIGIDITY PROGRESSION OVER TIME. L. Kremer1, L. Wagner1, A. Muthumani1, D. W. Powell1, A. J. Threlkeld1, R. Xia1

1. Physical Therapy, Creighton University, Omaha, NE.

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRUNK POSITION SENSE AND POSTURAL CONTROL DEFICITS IN PEOPLE POST STROKE. S. Ryerson1, J. Hidler1

1. National Rehabilitation Hospital, Washington, DC.

ASSESSING BALANCE IN GERIATRIC ORTHOPEDIC AND NEUROLOGIC POPULATIONS USING TWO STANDARD MEASURES. K. A. Butera1, S. Z. George1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

DUAL TASK ATTENTION AND INTERLIMB COORDINATION IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE. T. L. McIsaac1, P. Dhaliwal1, B. Benjapalakorn1

1. Biobehavioral Sciences, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY.

THE FEASIBILITY AND ACUTE EFFECTS OF POLESTRIDING IN INDIVIDUALS WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE WHO EXHIBIT FREEZING OF GAIT. J. V. Lynskey1, K. Clark1, K. Whitefield1, J. Stovall2, N. Krishnamurthi2, J. Samanta3, P. Manhant3, P. Bosch1, J. Abbas2

1. Physical Therapy, A.T. Still University, Mesa, AZ; 2. Center for Adaptive Neural Systems, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ; 3. Movement Disorders Specialists, Phoenix, AZ.

EFFECTIVENESS OF DANCE VIDEO GAME TRAINING IN DECREASING THE RISK OF FALLING IN SUBJECTS WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE. R. Naik1, S. Bronner1, J. Noah1, A. Tachibana2

1. ADAM Center, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY; 2. Dept. of Physiology and Neuroscience, Kanagawa Dental College, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, Japan.

COMPARISON OF A NEUROPROSTHESIS AND AN ANKLE FOOT ORTHOSIS ON WALKING SPEED, ENERGY COST, AND BALANCE IN A PATIENT WITH CHRONIC SPASTIC HEMIPLEGIA: A CASE REPORT. M. Eikenberry1, C. Kinney1

1. Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ.

UNILATERAL VESTIBULAR HYPOFUNCTION IN A 60 YEAR OLD PATIENT WITH A CHILDHOOD MEDICAL HISTORY OF MENINGITIS. A. D. Pause1

1. Pi Beta Phi Rehabilitation Institute, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

PEDIATRIC HEMIPARESIS: SYNERGISTIC TREATMENT USING REPETITIVE TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION AND CONSTRAINT INDUCED THERAPY. B. T. Gillick1, S. T. Ellsworth1, L. Elmajri1, E. S. Henneman1, J. R. Carey1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

MISDIAGNOSIS OF WERNICKE'S ENCEPHALOPATHY AS CONVERSION DISORDER: A CASE STUDY DEMONSTRATING THE IMPORTANCE OF DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS IN PHYSICAL THERAPY AND COMMUNICATION WITHIN THE INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM. S. Elgelid1, M. Gelder1

1. Nazareth College, Rochester, NY.

IMPLEMENTING A MODIFIED-CONSTRAINT INDUCED THERAPY PROGRAM IN A GROUP OUTPATIENT SETTING. E. Bryant1, K. K. Cleary1

1. Eastern Washington University, Spokane, WA.

NORMATIVE DATA FOR FUNCTIONAL BALANCE AND GAIT MEASURES IN CHILDREN AGED 14–18. B. Alsalaheen1, S. L. Whitney1, P. J. Sparto1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

VALIDATION OF A MODIFIED FOUR-SQUARE STEP TEST (mFSST) AND DEVELOPMENT OF A QUALITY SCORE (qFSST) IN COMMUNITY-DWELLING ELDERLY. A. Fergus1, J. Chamberlain1, G. Joukar1, A. Smith1

1. Physical Therapy, Shenandoah University, Winchester, VA.

VALIDATION OF THE STEPWATCH ACTIVITY MONITOR (SAM) WITH OBSERVATIONAL COUNTS OF STEPPING AND FIM LOCOMOTOR SCORES IN INDIVIDUALS POST STROKE. D. Straube1, L. O'Donnell1, T. Hornby2

1. Physical Therapy, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, IL; 2. Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

TARGETING SUPRAMAXIMAL STRENGTH IN INCOMPLETE SPINAL CORD INJURY: TIME AND INTENSITY DEPENDENT INCREASE IN VOLITIONAL TORQUE GENERATION. C. Thompson1, A. Jayaraman2, T. Hornby3

1. Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; 2. Center for Bionic Medicine, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; 3. Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.

DISSOCIATION OF NORMAL VERSUS SHEAR SURFACE FORCE GENERATION DURING LOCOMOTION IN PEOPLE POST-STROKE. J. Liang1, D. A. Brown1

1. Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

EXERCISE RESPONSE IN NON-AMBULATORY INDIVIDUALS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. B. J. Baker1, M. Shoemaker1, N. Holochwost1, L. Mirakovits1, B. Newell1, D. Robinson1

1. Physical Therapy, Grand Valley St Univ, Grand Rapids, MI.

UNDERSTANDING CLINICALLY IMPORTANT CHANGE IN GAIT SPEED IN PEOPLE WITH STROKE UNDERGOING INPATIENT REHABILITATION. J. Canbek1, G. D. Fulk1, L. Nof1, J. L. Echternach1

1. Physical Therapy, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL.

MINIMAL DETECTABLE CHANGE IN MAXIMUM STEP LENGTH, GAIT SPEED, AND FIVE TIMES SIT TO STAND IN PEOPLE WITH STROKE. V. Pardo1, D. Knuth1, B. McDermott1, J. Powell1, A. Goldberg2

1. Physical Therapy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; 2. Department of Health Care Sciences, Program in Physical Therapy, Mobility Research Laboratory, Institute of Gerontology, Wayne State University.

BREATHING AND STEPPING COORDINATION DURING DUAL TASKS IN PERSONS WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE. M. Wessel1, D. Clarke1, K. Kilbride1, L. Welsh1, C. Maher1, D. Glendinning2

1. Physical Therapy, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ; 2. Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, RWJ Medical School-UMDNJ, Piscataway, NJ.

THE ROLE OF SLEEP IN LEARNING A FUNCTIONAL MOTOR TASK. A. J. Sharman1, C. F. Siengsukon1

1. University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas, KS.

NEUROMUSCULAR PLASTICITY IN THE RAT FORELIMB AFTER CERVICAL SPINAL CORD INJURY. E. J. Gonzalez-Rothi1, D. D. Fuller1, R. Federico1, K. Vandenborne1, P. J. Reier2, M. A. Lane2

1. Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; 2. Neuroscience, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

CASE STUDY ASSESSING THE BIONESS L300 FOR IMPROVING GAIT POST-CVA. T. Rivers1, L. Philpot1, K. Sheridan1, C. Stobaugh1, J. VanLandingham1, C. Lairamore1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Central AR, Conway, AR.

ORGANIZATION OF THE RETICULOSPINAL TRACT IN A NON HUMAN PRIMATE MODEL AS REVEALED BY RETROGRADE TRACT TRACING. L. R. Montgomery2, L. B. Jakeman2, J. A. Buford1

1. Physical Therapy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH: 2. Neuroscience Graduate Studies Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

A NOVEL SHOE-BASED SENSOR TO DETECT ACTIVITY LEVELS IN PEOPLE WITH STROKE. G. D. Fulk1, S. Edgar3, E. Sazonov2

1. Physical Therapy, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY; 2. Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; 3. Electrical and Computer Engineering, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY.

USE OF THE NINTENDO WII GAMING SYSTEM TO IMPROVE BALANCE IN A COMMUNITY-DWELLING OLDER ADULT WITH PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY AND A HISTORY OF RECURRENT NEAR FALLS: A CASE REPORT. R. M. Hakim1, A. Balent1, M. Keyasko1, D. McGlynn1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Scranton, Scranton, PA.

VISUAL AND PROPRIOCEPTIVE FEEDBACK INFLUENCES STANCE TIME BUT NOT STEP LENGTH SYMMETRY DURING LOCOMOTOR TRAINING POST-STROKE. M. D. Lewek1, C. Wutzke2, J. Feasel3, C. Giuliani1, F. Brooks3, M. C. Whitton3

1. Division of Physical Therapy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 2. Human Movement Science Curriculum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; 3. Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.

EFFECTIVENESS OF STANDARDIZED BALANCE OUTCOME MEASURES IN ADULTS WITH CHRONIC TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY. L. Gadley1, S. F. Wainwright1

1. Physical Therapy, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA.

TRANSLATING EVIDENCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: DEVELOPMENT OF A TASK-SPECIFIC CIRCUIT TRAINING GROUP FOR PERSONS WITH ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY IN AN OUTPATIENT COMMUNITY RE-ENTRY PROGRAM. J. Hale1, J. Seale2

1. TIRR Memorial Hermann, Houston, TX; 2. Physical Therapy, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX.

THE EFFECT OF VESTIBULAR REHABILITATION ON ADULTS WITH BILATERAL VESTIBULAR HYPOFUNCTION: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW. F. Porciuncula1, C. C. Johnson1, L. B. Glickman1

1. Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

POSTURAL AND GAIT RETRAINING FOR PERSONS WITH PUSHER BEHAVIOR POST ACUTE STROKE. K. J. Komenda1, M. M. Weightman1, M. J. Finkelstein1

1. Rehabilitation Services, Sister Kenny Institute, Minneapolis, MN.

COMBINED MOTOR CONTROL OF THE UPPER LIMB FROM CORTICOSPINAL AND RETICULOSPINAL SYSTEMS. J. A. Buford3, L. R. Montgomery2, W. J. Herbert1

1. Allied Medicine–-Physical Therapy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; 2. Neuroscience Graduate Studies Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; 3. Center for Brain and Spinal Cord Repair, The Ohio St. University, Columbus, OH.

BODY-WEIGHT-SUPPORT TREADMILL TRAINING WITH MULTI-ANGLE THERABAND RESISTANCE FOR STROKE PATIENTS. B. D. Bishop1

1. Rehabilitation, Henry Ford Health System, Allen Park, MI.

PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR DISCHARGE LOCATION FOLLOWING ACUTE STROKE REHABILITATION. S. A. Keller1, M. Burns1, K. Ruroede1

1. Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital, Wheaton, IL.

OUTCOME MEASURES IN ACUTE STROKE REHABILITATION: A COMPARISON OF THE BERG BALANCE SCALE AND THE PASS TEST. S. A. Keller1, M. Burns1, K. Ruroede1

1. Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital, Wheaton, IL.

THE PARKINSON WELLNESS RECOVERY–-PWR! PROJECT. DEVELOPING “NEUROFITNESS FOR LIFE” PROGRAMMING TO OPTIMIZE FUNCTION, LEARNING, AND BRAIN CHANGE FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH PARKINSON DISEASE. B. G. Farley1, V. Carter2

1. Physiology, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; 2. Physical Therapy, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ.

A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF VIRTUAL REALITY-BASED REHABILITATION TO IMPROVE GAIT IN PATIENTS POST STROKE. K. Kyle1, M. Horne1, J. Hindman1, R. M. Hakim1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Scranton, Scranton, PA.

KIDS STEP STUDY: LOCOMOTOR TRAINING OUTCOMES AND USE OF SELECT LONG TRACTS AS PREDICTIVE BIOMARKERS OF RESPONSIVENESS AFTER CHRONIC, INCOMPLETE SPINAL CORD INJURY. A. Behrman1, E. J. Fox1, S. A. Trimble1, S. Suter1, C. Senesac1, N. J. Tester3, J. Kleim2, D. R. Howland2

1. Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; 2. Neuroscience, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; 3. VA Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall VA Medical Center, Gainesville, FL.

PREVALENCE OF VESTIBULAR HYPOFUNCTION AND ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS FOR FALLS IN COMMUNITY DWELLING ELDERS. K. M. Johnson1, A. Burke-Doe1, J. Laslovich1, L. Johnson1

1. Doctor of Physical Therapy, University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences, San Marcos, CA.

THE EFFECTS OF STRENGTHENING ON A PATIENT WITH ALEXANDER DISEASE: A CASE REPORT. T. Lauretta1, C. Senesac1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

WALKING SPEED AND DISTANCE IMPROVES WITH A SHORT-BURST OF EITHER BODY WEIGHT SUPPORTED TREADMILL TRAINING OR OVERGROUND WALKING TRAINING FOR PERSONS WITH CHRONIC STROKE. S. A. Combs1, L. Brower1, D. Colburn1, A. Harmeyer1, T. Poole1, A. A. Schmid2

1. Krannert School of Physical Therapy, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN; 2. Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN.

THE EFFECTS OF THE GIVMOHR SLING ON GAIT PARAMETERS POST STROKE. K. Dieruf1, R. Hearting1, S. Wilkie1

1. University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.

COMPARING THE EFFICACY OF TWO DIFFERENT EXERCISE PROGRAMS FOR PEOPLE WITH PD REQUIRES SENSITIVE MEASURES. L. A. King2, J. Wilhelm1, A. Serdar1, J. Schlimgen1, M. Smith1, A. Salarian2, F. B. Horak2

1. Physical therapy, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR; 2. Neurology, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR.

A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF THE USE OF VESTIBULAR AND VISION THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF POST CONCUSSION SYNDROME IN ATHLETES. C. Durborow1, D. Watson-Shaeffer1, C. Beckley2

1. Physical Therapy, Bryn Mawr Rehabilitation Hospital, Malvern, PA; 2. Occupational Therapy, Bryn Mawr Rehabilitation Hospital, Malvern, PA.

THE EFFECT OF MANUAL THERAPY AND GAIT TRAINING ON BALANCE, MOBILITY AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN A PERSON WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE AND KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS. A. Attorri1, M. Garcia1, J. Freund1

1. Physical Therapy Education, Elon University, Elon, NC.

RETENTION OF A WALKING VISUOMOTOR ADAPTATION IN HEALTHY ADULTS. A. S. Hanson1, S. Tseng1, S. M. Morton1

1. PT & Rehab Science, Univ of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.

DANCE VIDEO GAME TRAINING CAUSES SHIFTS IN STRIATUM AND CEREBELLUM ACTIVITY. S. Bronner1, J. Noah1, A. Tachibana2

1. ADAM Center, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY; 2. Dept. of Physiology and Neuroscience, Kanagawa Dental College, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, Japan.

MAXIMUM WALKING SPEEDS OBTAINED USING TREADMILL AND OVERGROUND ROBOTIC SYSTEM IN PERSONS WITH POST-STROKE HEMIPLEGIA. C. E. Capo-Lugo1, C. Mullens1, D. A. Brown2

1. Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; 2. Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Fienberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

INTERMITTENT WALKING RESULTS IN GREATER DISTANCE AND LESS FATIGUE THAN CONTINUOUS WALKING IN PERSONS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. H. I. Karpatkin1, B. Breismeister1, R. Hartmann1, D. Napolione1, R. Luu1

1. Physical Therapy, Hunter College, City University of New York, New York, NY.

POST-CONCUSSION SYNDROME: A MULTI-MODAL INTERVENTION APPROACH. P. Vidal1, A. Guarini1, P. Caldiero1, K. Smarrito1, A. Goodman2

1. Specialized Physical Therapy, LLC, Cherry Hill, NJ; 2. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Voorhees, NJ.

VERTIGO AND BPPV IN AN ADOLESCENT. J. L. O'Brien1

1. Vestibular Rehabilitation, NYU Langone Medical Center Rusk Institute, New York, NY.

USE OF RESEARCH METHODOLOGY TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF MEDICATION ON FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE IN THE TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY POPULATION. C. Tassini1

1. MossRehab, Elkins Park, PA.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTENSITY OF INPATIENT STROKE REHABILITATION IS RELATED TO FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME. S. Duffy1, K. Zalewski1

1. Human Movement Sciences, Milwaukee, WI.

THE FEASIBILITY AND EFFICACY OF A COMMUNITY EXERCISE CLASS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH EARLY STAGE PARKINSON'S DISEASE. R. Tappan1, H. Roth1

1. Sensory Motor Performance Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

DEVELOPMENT OF 3D IMMERSIVE VIDEOGAME TO IMPROVE ARM-POSTURAL COORDINATION IN PATIENTS WITH TBI. K. Ustinova1, A. Schafe1

1. Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI.

MODIFICATION OF THE FOUR SQUARE STEP TEST AND ITS RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY IN PEOPLE POST STROKE. M. Roos2, D. S. Reisman1, G. Hicks1, S. Binder-Macleod1, K. Rudolph1

1. Department of Physical Therapy, Univ Delaware, Newark, DE; 2. Biomechanics & Movement Science, University of Delaware, Newark, DE.

MOBILITY AND BALANCE DIAGNOSTIC CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM FOR NEUROLOGIC PHYSICAL THERAPY. A. de Joya1, A. de Joya2

1. Physical Therapy, TIRR Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, TX; 2. Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.

USE OF THE WII FIT FOR BALANCE REHABILITATION: ESTABLISHING PARAMETERS FOR HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS, PRELIMINARY RESULTS. M. Burns1, K. Andeway1, P. Eppenstein1, K. Ruroede1

1. Physical Therapy, Marianjoy, Wheaton, IL.

THE NEED FOR SPEED: BETTER MOVEMENT QUALITY DURING FASTER TASK PERFORMANCE AFTER STROKE. S. L. DeJong1, S. Y. Schaefer1, C. E. Lang1

1. Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University, St. Louis, MO.

VALIDITY OF THE K-9 & BESTEST BALANCE MEASURES IN COMMUNITY-DWELLING STROKE SURVIVORS. J. Breger1, N. Collins1, A. Deshpande1, L. Johnston1, J. LeJeune1, P. Palit1, K. Potter1, L. D. Hedman1, D. A. Brown1

1. Physical Therapy and Human Movement Science, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

STEP LENGTH SYMMETRY ADAPTATION GENERALIZES FROM TREADMILL TO OVERGROUND WALKING IN NONDISABLED AND PERSONS WITH STROKE AND HEMIPARESIS. D. Savin1, S. M. Morton2, J. Whitall1

1. Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland Baltimore, Baltimore, MD; 2. Graduate Program in Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.

IMPAIRMENTS IN LOW LEVEL FORCE CONTROL OF PARETIC HIP FLEXORS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH CLINICAL MEASUREMENTS OF FUNCTION. K. Kirking1, H. Kuhnen1, E. Burns1, E. Christou2, S. Hunter1, B. D. Schmit1, A. Hyngstrom1

1. Department of Physical Therapy, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; 2. Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

A STEP ACTIVITY MONITORING PROGRAM IMPROVES REAL WORLD WALKING ACTIVITY POST STROKE. K. A. Danks1, M. Roos2, D. Reisman1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE; 2. Biomechanics and Movement Science, University of Delaware, Newark, DE.

INCREASED FUNCTIONAL MOBILITY AFTER IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTIVITY BASED LOCOMOTOR TRAINING IN AN INDIVIDUAL WITH CHRONIC INCOMPLETE SPINAL CORD INJURY. S. A. Ostertag1, A. McDonald1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Montana, Missoula, MT.

MAXIMUM ELBOW EXTENSION IS ACHIEVED WHEN INITIALLY COMBINED WITH GREATER AMOUNTS OF HORIZONTAL SHOULDER FLEXION; A KINEMATIC EVALUATION OF REACHING IN CHRONIC SEVERE STROKE. M. D. Ellis1, K. Hussar1, L. Alsauskaite1, K. Kumar1, J. Westgate1, J. P. Dewald1

1. Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

THE EFFECT OF TASK-SPECIFIC TRAINING IN A PERSON WITH CEREBELLAR ATAXIA AND VERTIG. O. P. Cameron1, J. Freund1

1. Elon University, Elon, NC.

VESTIBULAR REHABILITATION FOR PERSONS WITH POST-CONCUSSION SYNDROME. H. Dillon-Anderson1, F. Fakhoury1, G. Mattoccia1, J. Papp1, J. Pinkerto1, S. Salvatore1, E. T. Cohen1

1. Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, UMDNJ and Rutgers, Stratford, NJ.

THE EFFECT OF AEROBIC EXERCISE ON PERCEIVED FATIGUE IN PEOPLE WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. E. T. Cohen1, A. Dubreuil1, T. Hockey1, R. Johnson1, M. Mehra1, D. Zeitlin1

1. Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, UMDNJ and Rutgers, Stratford, NJ.

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN APATHY AND PHYSICAL FUNCTIONING IN INDIVIDUALS WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE. M. Masterson1, L. Vuyk1

1. Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH.

ASSESSING BALANCE USING THE BRUNEL BALANCE ASSESSMENT IN A PATIENT WITH AN ACUTE STROKE: A CASE STUDY. J. Parsons2, J. Mowder-Tinney1

1. Nazareth College, Rochester, NY; 2. University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY.

GRIP TYPE AND TASK GOAL MODIFY REACH-TO-GRASP PERFORMANCE IN PEOPLE WITH POST-STROKE HEMIPARESIS. S. Y. Schaefer1, S. L. DeJong1, K. M. Cherry1, C. E. Lang1

1. Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

SEQUENCING BILATERAL PROXIMAL AND UNILATERAL TASK ORIENTED ARM TRAINING IMPROVES ARM AND HAND FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH MODERATE SEVERITY CHRONIC HEMIPARESIS. S. McCombe Waller1, A. Gaeta1, T. Jenkins1, W. Liu2, J. Whitall1

1. Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD; 2. Department of Physical Therapy, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL.

EXAMINATION OF THE BALANCE EVALUATION SYSTEMS TEST (BESTEST): RELIABILITY AND CLINICAL INSIGHTS. P. K. Padgett1, J. V. Jacobs1, S. L. Kasser1

1. Rehabilitation and Movement Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT.

PATTERNS IN SEATING EQUIPMENT EVALUATION/PROVISION AND PATIENT SATISFACTION: FINDINGS FROM THE SCI REHAB PROJECT. S. T. Schroeder1

1. Allied Health, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

EXERCISE TRAINING IMPROVES MUSCLE FUNCTION WITHOUT MUSCLE STRUCTURE CHANGES IN PERSONS WITH MODERATE PARKINSON DISEASE. O. Addison1, K. B. Foreman1, R. L. Marcus1, P. C. LaStayo1, L. E. Dibble1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

REGARDLESS OF WALKING SPEED CAPACITY, DAILY WALKING DURATION AND INTENSITY IS DECREASED AFTER STROKE. M. Roos2, K. Rudolph1, D. Reisman1

1. Department of Physical Therapy, Univ Delaware, Newark, DE; 2. Biomechanics and Movement Science, University of Delaware, Newark, DE.

FACTORS THAT RELATE TO COMMUNITY MOBILITY IN PERSON'S WITH PARKINSON DISEASE. M. P. Ford1, P. Harbin1, D. Forte1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.

NON-MOTOR SYMPTOMS IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE: CHARACTERISTICS OF FALLERS AND NON-FALLERS. M. S. Bryant1, G. Hou2, S. Rivas1, A. Fernandez1, E. Lai3, E. Protas1

1. University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX; 2. Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; 3. The Methodist Neurological Institutes, Houston, TX.

POSTURAL ORIENTATION INFLUENCES CORTICOSPINAL EXCITABILITY TO THE REPRESENTATION OF THE ARM. S. McCombe Waller1, M. Rogers1, J. Rino3, G. F. Wittenberg2

1. Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; 2. Baltimore VA Medical Center, GRECC and University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; 3. University of Delaware, Newark, DE.

LOCOMOTOR LEARNING IS SLOWED AFTER STROKE. C. M. Tyrell2, D. Reisman1

1. Physical Therapy, Univ Delaware, Newark, DE; 2. BIOMS, University of Delaware, Newark, DE.

PREDICTION OF DISCHARGE WALKING ABILITY FROM INITIAL INPATIENT ASSESSMENT IN A STROKE REHABILITATION POPULATION. M. Bland1, A. Sturmoski2, M. Whitson3, L. Tabor Connor4, R. Fucetola5, T. Huskey5, M. Corbetta5, C. E. Lang1

1. Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University, St. Louis, MO; 2. The Rehabilitation Institute of St. Louis, St. Louis, MO; 3. Rehabilitation Services, Barnes Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO; 4. Program in Occupational Therapy, Washington University, St. Louis, MO; 5. Department of Neurology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO.

MULTIPLE CONTRIBUTIONS TO BALANCE IMPAIRMENT AFTER MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY. E. Anson1

1. Physical Therapy, Adventist Rehabilitation Hospital of Maryland, Silver Spring, MD.

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF MIRROR THERAPY FOLLOWING STROKE: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE. J. Mount1, C. Hunsberger1, K. Lagzdins1, A. Quimby1, J. Ulichney1, R. Wishart1

1. Physical Therapy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA.

OPERANT CONDITIONING OF TIBIALIS ANTERIOR AND SOLEUS H-REFLEX IMPROVES SPINAL REFLEX MODULATION AND WALKING FUNCTION IN INDIVIDUALS WITH MOTOR-INCOMPLETE SPINAL CORD INJURY. K. J. Manella1, E. C. Field-Fote2

1. Physical Therapy, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL; 2. The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL.

BARRIERS TO EXERCISE IN PERSONS WITH PARKINSON DISEASE. T. Ellis1, J. K. Boudreau2, T. R. DeAngelis1, L. E. Brown1, J. Cavanaugh2, G. M. Earhart3, M. Ford4, K. B. Foreman5, L. E. Dibble5

1. Physical Therapy & Athletic Training, Boston University; College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston, MA; 2. Physical Therapy, University of New England, Portland, ME; 3. Physical Therapy, Washington University in St. Louis, MO; 4. Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham; 5. Physical Therapy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

COMPARISON OF “LESS AFFECTED LIMB” REACHING KINEMATICS IN INDIVIDUALS WITH CHRONIC STROKE AND HEALTHY AGE-MATCHED CONTROLS. K. Carnahan1, S. Peacock1, A. Van Buskirk1, S. A. Combs1, M. A. Finley1

1. Krannert School of Physical Therapy, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN.

NONINVASIVE BRAIN STIMULATION ENHANCES ANKLE MOTOR SKILL ACQUISITION AND RETENTION. B. Shah1, S. Madhavan1

1. Physical Therapy, UIC, Chicago, IL.

TREADMILL TRAINING WITH LOKOMAT -APPLIED RESISTANCE TO ENHANCE FUNCTIONAL AMBULATION IN PEOPLE WITH INCOMPLETE SPINAL CORD INJURY. T. Lam1, K. Pauhl1, A. Bigelow4, A. Krassioukov2, J. Eng3

1. School of Human Kinetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2. Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 3. Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 4. Neuromotion Physical Therapy, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

EFFECTS OF PASSIVE STANDING, DYNAMIC STANDING AND DYNAMIC STANDING AUGMENTED BY FUNCTIONAL ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON URINARY CALCIUM, SPASTICITY AND BOWEL FUNCTION IN A PERSON WITH PARAPLEGIA. B. E. Day1, D. J. Simpson1, E. Diez2

1. CarePartners Health Services, Asheville, NC; 2. Comprehensive Rehabilitation Care Physicians PLLC, Asheville, NC.

GAIT COORDINATION IN PARKINSON DISEASE: EFFECTS OF STEP LENGTH AND CADENCE MANIPULATIONS. A. J. Williams1, G. Earhart1

1. Washington University, Saint Louis, MO.

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF FES COMBINED WITH CONVENTIONAL THERAPY VERSUS CONVENTIONAL THERAPY ALONE IN POST-STROKE GAIT TRAINING: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW. B. McNeal1, K. Vance1

1. Physical Therapy, Southwest Baptist University, Bolivar, MO.

UTILIZING INTENSIVE-AMPLITUDE SPECIFIC THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES AS AN EFFECTIVE STRATEGY FOR IMPROVING FUNCTIONAL MOBILITY IN PATIENTS DIAGNOSED WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE. R. L. Julius1, M. Sandmann1, J. A. Bajwa1, P. Tatman1, A. Fehrer1

1. Capistrant Center for Movement Disorders, Bethesda Hospital, Saint Paul, MN.

RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF USING A ROBOTIC EXOSKELETON TO ASSESS LOWER LIMB STATIC POSITION SENSE IN PERSONS WITH SPINAL CORD INJURY. A. Domingo1, T. Lam1

1. Human Kinetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

USING A ‘REVERSE' BRANDT-DAROFF EXERCISE IN THE TREATMENT OF ANTERIOR CANAL BENIGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO. B. Kinne1

1. Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI.

FAMILY-CENTERED CARE DURING CONSTRAINT INDUCED MOVEMENT THERAPY. S. Blanton1, P. Clark2, D. Cussen1, C. Schwartz1, A. Holmes1, B. Regan1, D. Aycock2

1. Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; 2. Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA.

THE HEAD SHAKE SENSORY ORGANIZATION TEST (HS-SOT): NORMATIVE DATA AND CORRELATION WITH DYNAMIC VISUAL ACUITY TESTING. S. C. Livingston1, D. Burch1, T. Clapp1, H. Gream1, E. Puckett1, A. Cripps1

1. Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.

THE EFFECT OF AN AQUATIC EXERCISE PROGRAM ON BALANCE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE. A. Dupre1, B. Marcoux1, M. Jacobs1, J. Fasano1, M. Seyboth1, E. Johnson1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI.

REORGANIZATION OF SPINAL NEURAL CIRCUITS AFTER LOCOMOTOR TRAINING IN HUMAN SPINAL CORD INJURY. M. Knikou3, N. Hajela2, A. C. Smith1, C. K. Mummidisetty1, Z. W. Rymer1

1. Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; 2. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; 3. The Graduate Center, City University of New York, NY.

TOLERANCE TO A TILT TABLE STANDING PROTOCOL IN AN ACUTE STROKE-UNIT SETTING: A PILOT STUDY. H. Lietz1, I. Sausser1, M. Baltz1, D. Brown3, C. Kalpakjian2

1. Physical Therapy, University of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI; 2. PM&R, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 3. Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

FACTORS RELATED TO WALKING ECONOMY IN PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE. C. L. Christiansen1, B. S. Davidson3, W. M. Kohrt2, M. Schenkman1

1. Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO; 2. Geriatric Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO; 3. Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Denver, Denver, CO.

INTER-RATER RELIABILITY AND CONSISTENCY OF THE DYNAMIC GAIT INDEX AMONG VESTIBULAR PHYSICAL THERAPISTS AT THE CLEVELAND CLINIC. K. E. Cherian1, A. Cassady1, V. K. Ranganathan1

1. Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.

INCIDENCE AND IMPACT OF DVT AND/OR PE FOLLOWING BRAIN INJURY DURING INPATIENT REHABILITATION. C. M. McQuillan1, T. L. Fetter1

1. Physical Therapy, Marianjoy Rehabilation Hospital, Wheaton, IL.

PARTICIPANTS' PERSPECTIVES ON THE BENEFITS ASSOCIATED WITH AN INTENSIVE, TASK-SPECIFIC INTERVENTION FOR GAIT, BALANCE AND MOBILITY IN INDIVIDUALS WITH CHRONIC STROKE: A QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. A. R. Merlo1, A. Goodman2, B. K. McClenaghan3, S. L. Fritz3

1. Physical Therapy, Franklin Pierce University, Goodyear, AZ; 2. Health, Leisure and Exercise Science, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC; 3. Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.

INFORMING LOCOMOTOR TRAINING PRESCRIPTION POST-STROKE. D. K. Rose1, A. L. Behrman1, X. Lin1, K. J. Sullivan2, J. K. Tilson2, D. Martin1, R. Schofield1, S. S. Wu1, P. Duncan3

1. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; 2. University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; 3. Duke University, Durham, NC.

THE EXPERIENCE OF IMPLEMENTING STANDARDIZED STROKE OUTCOME MEASURES ACROSS THE CONTINUA OF POST-ACUTE CARE. M. Danzl1, E. G. Hunter2

1. Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY; 2. Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital, Lexington, KY.

MOVEMENT SYSTEM DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF A PATIENT WITH AN INCOMPLETE SPINAL CORD INJURY. L. Horan1, S. L. Cornbleet1

1. Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

PATTERNS IN MANUAL AND POWER WHEELCHAIR TRAINING: FINDINGS FROM THE SCI REHAB PROJECT. S. T. Schroeder1

1. Allied Health, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago/University of Michigan, Chicago, IL.

BLUE PRESCRIPTION: FACILITATING SELF-DIRECTED INCREASES IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY FOR PEOPLE WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. L. A. Hale1, H. Mulligan1, C. Smith1, G. J. Treharne2

1. School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 2. Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

THE EXCITE TRIAL: ANALYSIS OF “NON-COMPLETED” WOLF MOTOR FUNCTION TEST ITEMS. S. L. Wolf1, T. Lonergan1, N. Richardson1

1. Division of Physical Therapy, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.

FALLING AND FEAR OF FALLING AFTER STROKE: A QUALITATIVE STUDY. C. P. Kelley1, M. Carlegis1, K. Suchma1, S. K. Ostwald2

1. School of Physical Therapy, Texas Woman's University, Houston, TX; 2. School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX.

RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF RESTING STATE FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY IN THE MOTOR CORTEX AS REVEALED BY NEAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY. A. Butler1, H. Atwood1, K. Cleveland1, D. C. Fennerty1, E. D. Wigfall1, J. L. Wallace1, J. Rajendra1, G. James2

1. Rehabilitation Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; 2. Psychiatric Research Institute, University of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR.

DANCING FOR BALANCE AND GAIT: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE EFFICACY OF DANCE FOR PATIENTS WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE. K. Curbow Wilcox1, A. H. Banahan1, R. C. Boyd1, J. L. Hill1, N. P. Johnson1, S. D. Kitchens1, M. T. Prewitt1, T. R. Skrmetti1

1. School of Health Related Professions, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS.

IS BOTULINUM TOXIN EFFECTIVE IN IMPROVING GAIT PARAMETERS IN PATIENTS WITH HEMIPLEGIA AND SPASTICITY? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW. K. H. McCullough1, G. L. McRae1, A. E. Fountain1, P. Stegall1, L. J. Barnes2, K. Curbow Wilcox2

1. University Rehabilitation Center, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS; 2. School of Health Related Professions, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS.

ARE BALANCE AND GAIT ASSOCIATED WITH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN COMMUNITY-DWELLING STROKE SURVIVORS? J. E. Sullivan1, L. Dunn1, K. Korsch1, S. Roeder1, V. Warner1

1. Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF THE VESTIBULAR ACTIVITIES AND PARTICIPATION (VAP) MEASURE. A. A. Alghwiri1, S. L. Whitney2, C. E. Baker6, P. J. Sparto2, G. Marchetti5, J. C. Rogers3, J. M. Furman4

1. Physical Therapy, The University of Jordan, Amman, JORDAN; 2. Physical Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; 3. Occupational Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; 4. Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; 5. Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA; 6. Education, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

THE MOBILITY SCALE FOR ACUTE STROKE (MSAS) PREDICTS DISCHARGE DESTINATION FROM THE ACUTE CARE SETTING. M. L. Tinl1, M. Kale1, S. Doshi1, M. Beninato2

1. Department of Rehabilitation Services, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA; 2. Department of Physical Therapy School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA.

THE EFFECT OF A SAFE PATIENT HANDLING PROGRAM ON REHABILITATION OUTCOMES FOR PATIENTS WITH STROKE. M. Campo1

1. School of Health and Natural Sciences, Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, NY.

IS VIRTUAL REALITY GAMING AN EFFECTIVE ADJUNCT TO TRADITIONAL THERAPY IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY? P. D. Palma1, E. McFarling1, T. Romero1, E. Van Den Eynde1, S. Flynn2, M. Sholas1

1. Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA; 2. Blue Marble Rehabilitation, Inc, Altadena, CA.

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FALL RISK CLASSIFICATIONS AND FALL HISTORY IN COMMUNITY DWELLING OLDER ADULTS. K. K. Cleary1, C. Henderson2

1. Eastern Washington University, Spokane, WA; 2. Aegis Therapies, Spokane, WA.

© 2011 Neurology Section, APTA

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