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Frontotemporal Degeneration in the Patient With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Helping the Caregiver Cope

Houseman, Gail; Walsh, Susan; Brothers, Allyson; Lyter, Judy; Simmons, Zachary; Klapper, Jennifer

Journal of Neuroscience Nursing: April 2013 - Volume 45 - Issue 2 - p 96–100
doi: 10.1097/JNN.0b013e318282900b
Article

ABSTRACT: Research in the previous decade has found a link between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal degeneration (FTD). It is estimated that as many as 50% of all people with ALS will have some degree of cognitive impairment and that approximately 10%–25% of patients will meet the Neary criteria for FTD. For the caregivers of persons with both ALS and FTD, the burden of care can be quite high. Nurses are in a position to help the caregivers cope.

Questions or comments about this article may be directed to Gail Houseman, RN CNS-BC, at Gail@alsphiladelphia.org. She is a Regional Nurse Coordinator for The ALS Association Greater Philadelphia Chapter, Ambler, PA.

Susan Walsh, MSN ACNS-BC, is a Regional Nurse Coordinator for The ALS Association Greater Philadelphia Chapter, Ambler, PA.

Allyson Brothers, MA, is a Doctoral Student of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.

Judy Lyter, MS LPC, is a Mental Health Nurse for The ALS Association Greater Philadelphia Chapter, Ambler, PA.

Zachary Simmons, MD, is a Professor of Neurology and the Director of the Neuromuscular Program and ALS Center at the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA.

Jennifer Klapper, RN CNS-BC, is a Mental Health Nurse for The ALS Association Greater Philadelphia Chapter, Ambler, PA.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

© 2013 American Association of Neuroscience Nurses