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The Educational Needs of Newly Diagnosed Stroke Patients

Yonaty, Sari-Ann; Kitchie, Sharon

Journal of Neuroscience Nursing:
doi: 10.1097/JNN.0b013e31826663f2
Article: Online Only
Abstract

ABSTRACT: There is limited research related to perceived educational needs among the newly diagnosed first-time stroke population. This descriptive correlational study was conducted to determine the perceived importance to learn about specific stroke-related topics and the degree of satisfaction with stroke education. Seventy-one newly diagnosed stroke patients from two metropolitan hospitals received a self-report Likert-type questionnaire consisting of eight domains related to different aspects of stroke education. The questionnaire was distributed 24–72 hours after admission to the hospital, upon discharge, and 2 weeks postdischarge. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t tests, and repeated measures analysis of variance. Medical knowledge and medication treatment were rated the most important to learn. Treatment of stroke with herbal or alternative medicine and dietary habits were the least important of the eight domains. Overall, patients were not satisfied with stroke education.

In Brief

In this article, the authors discuss the learning needs of newly diagnosed stroke patients and their families as well as the perceived level of importance the subjects assigned to these topics. They underscore the significance of finding the best fit among the educational content, teaching methods, and the patients themselves.

Author Information

Questions or comments about this article may be directed to Sari-Ann Yonaty, PhD FNP, at yonatys@upstate.edu. She is a nurse practitioner in Neurocritical Care at SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY.

Sharon Kitchie, PhD RN, is an adjunct instructor at Keuka College, Penn Yan, NY.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

© 2012 American Association of Neuroscience Nurses