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Nursing Benefits of Using an Automated Injection System for Ictal Brain Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography

vonHofen, Geraldine; Evangelista, Tonya; Lordeon, Patricia

Journal of Neuroscience Nursing: April 2012 - Volume 44 - Issue 2 - p 91–95
doi: 10.1097/JNN.0b013e3182477a78
Article

ABSTRACT: The traditional method of administering radioactive isotopes to pediatric patients undergoing ictal brain single photon emission computed tomography testing has been by manual injections. This method presents certain challenges for nursing, including time requirements and safety risks. This quality improvement project discusses the implementation of an automated injection system for isotope administration and its impact on staffing, safety, and nursing satisfaction. It was conducted in an epilepsy monitoring unit at a large urban pediatric facility. Results of this project showed a decrease in the number of nurses exposed to radiation and improved nursing satisfaction with the use of the automated injection system. In addition, there was a decrease in the number of nursing hours required during ictal brain single photon emission computed tomography testing.

Questions or comments about this article may be directed to Geraldine vonHofen, RN, at geraldine.vonhofen@chp.edu. She is a patient service supervisor at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA.

Tonya Evangelista, MSN RN CPHON CPN, is a nurse educator at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA.

Patricia Lordeon, R EEG T, is the neurodiagnostics supervisor at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA.

There was no funding received for the design or implementation of this quality improvement project, and the authors declare no conflicts of interest.

© 2012 American Association of Neuroscience Nurses