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Subjective Sleep, Burden, Depression, and General Health Among Caregivers of Veterans Poststroke

Rittman, Maude; Hinojosa, Melanie Sberna; Findley, Kim

Journal of Neuroscience Nursing: February 2009 - Volume 41 - Issue 1 - p 39-52
doi: 10.1097/JNN.0b013e318193459a
Article

The purposes of this article are to explore and describe subjective sleep experiences of informal caregivers of stroke survivors and to explore the relationships between subjective sleep experiences, caregiver burden, depression, and health to provide a broader portrait of the role that sleep plays in the stroke caregiving experience. A total of 276 caregivers and veterans participated in the study. Results indicate a greater risk of depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale) among caregivers who sleep less, have difficulty achieving daytime enthusiasm, use sleep medications, and have poor sleep quality. Caregivers who sleep less have difficulty achieving daytime enthusiasm and are at greater risk of poor health. Greater caregiver burden was associated with less sleep and use of sleep medications. This descriptive analysis demonstrates the important relationship between sleep, depression, health, and burden and can lead to interventions to diagnose and treat sleep difficulties in caregivers.

Melanie Sberna Hinojosa, PhD, is an assistant professor at Department of Family and Community Medicine Center for Healthy Communities, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI.

Kim Findley, RN, is a research nurse at North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center, Gainesville, FL.

Questions or comments about this article may be directed to Maude Rittman, PhD RN, at maude.rittman@va.gov. She is a chief nurse for research and health services researcher at North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center, Gainesville, FL.

© 2009 American Association of Neuroscience Nurses