Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Prevalence of Recurrent Vulvovaginal Candidiasis in 5 European Countries and the United States: Results From an Internet Panel Survey

Foxman, Betsy PhD1; Muraglia, Ryan BS1; Dietz, Jean-Paul PhD2; Sobel, Jack D. MD3; Wagner, Julian PhD4

Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease: July 2013 - Volume 17 - Issue 3 - p 340–345
doi: 10.1097/LGT.0b013e318273e8cf
Basic Science

Objective: This study aimed to estimate prevalence of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and recurring VVC (RVVC).

Materials and Methods: An online omnibus survey was administered to 6,010 women aged 16 and older in 6 countries.

Results: We analyzed surveys from 6,000 women. Depending on the country, between 29% and 49% of participating women reported having a health care provider–diagnosed vaginal yeast infection during their lifetime. More than one fifth of women reporting one vaginal yeast infection also reported a 12-month period with 4 or more infections (RVVC) (overall 9%). The cumulative probability of RVVC after an initial vaginal yeast infection was very high. By age 25 years, the probability was 10% for women having had 1 initial yeast infection. By age 50 years, it was 25%.

Conclusions: The overall rates of VVC and RVVC were high and consistent with previous findings. Results were consistent across countries with the exception of France, which had a lower rate of VVC. This may reflect differences in risk behavior, response to infection, or sampling biases. Recurring VVC is a significant health problem in western countries, and the probability that VVC will progress to RVVC is high.

Recurring VVC is a significant health problem in western countries, and the probability that VVC will progress to RVVC is high.

1Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 2HMAccess, Health and Market Access Strategies S.A.S., France; 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; and 4Pevion Biotech AG, Bern, Switzerland

Reprint requests to: Betsy Foxman, PhD, Center for Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029. E-mail: bfoxman@umich.edu

The authors have declared they have no conflicts of interest.

This work was supported by Pevion Biotech AG, Switzerland.

Copyright © 2013 by the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology