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The Development of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination to Assess Completion of Training in Colposcopy: The British Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology Model for Assessment in the United Kingdom

Shehmar, Manjeet MRCOG1; Redman, Charles FRCOG, MD2; Cruickshank, Margaret FRCOG, MD3

Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease: October 2009 - Volume 13 - Issue 4 - pp 224-229
doi: 10.1097/LGT.0b013e318195bd45
Original Articles
Spanish Translation

Objective. To comply with the Postgraduate Medical Education Training Board and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidance, the British Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (BSCCP) introduced a new assessment method for certification. The medical education evidence, practicalities, and experience of the BSCCP Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) are presented in this article.

Materials. The rationale behind the OSCE has been supported by medical education literature.

Methods. The experience of those running the BSCCP OSCE has been used to provide a theoretical basis for considerations when planning an OSCE. The BSCCP introduced an OSCE to confirm competency in performing colposcopy on completion of training in the United Kingdom. The content for the OSCE was defined already in the BSCCP trainees' manual, and training is delivered locally. Current evidence from medical education research was used to support the introduction of the OSCE, including the development of a bank of OSCE questions, the construction of the OSCE content, and the standard setting of the examination at a level appropriate for completion of training for both medical and nursing colposcopy trainees. Examiners were recruited from the society membership and provided with training. The OSCE has been run since November 2006 to determine competency and to identify excellence.

Results. The first OSCE was held on November 23, 2006, and 5 OSCEs have been held to date. One hundred forty-five candidates have sat the examination. The mean pass mark for the examination was 60% (range = 58-63%). The mean pass rate for the examination was 82% (range = 76-90%).

Conclusions. We have developed and run an OSCE examination for completion of training in colposcopy in the joint BSCCP/Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists training program for medical and nursing trainees. This has proved to be feasible, and we are conducting an ongoing evaluation of the reliability, validity, and acceptability of this assessment.

The British Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology has developed and introduced an Objective Structured Clinical Examination to confirm completion of training in colposcopy in the United Kingdom.

1University Hospital Coventry & Warwick, Coventry; 2University Hospital North Staffordshire, Stoke-on-Trent; and 3University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom

Reprint requests to: Manjeet Shehmar, MRCOG, University Hospital Coventry & Warwick, Coventry, UK. E-mail: mshehmar@doctors.org.uk

©2009The American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology