Skip Navigation LinksHome > December 2012 - Volume 60 - Issue 8 > High-Protein Diets Alters Body Composition and Improves Insu...
Journal of Investigative Medicine:
doi: 10.231/JIM.0b013e3182746ce8
Original Articles

High-Protein Diets Alters Body Composition and Improves Insulin Resistance in a Rat Model of Low Birth Weight

Yu, Mu-xue MD*; Shen, Zhen-yu MD*; Qiu, Xiao-shan MM*; Mo, Qing-ping MB

Collapse Box

Abstract

Objective: We aimed to investigate the effects of early high-protein supplementation on low birth weight (LBW)–associated adult metabolic disturbances.

Materials and Methods: This study involved 32 LBW rat pups that were fed a normal protein (20% of energy intake) diet or high-protein (30% of energy intake) diet on their first 4 weeks of life. Sixteen rat pups with normal birth weight (NBW) fed the normal-protein diet were included as control. Biochemical measurements were performed at 4 and 12 weeks of age.

Results: Low birth weight offspring showed significantly (P < 0.05) increased fat mass percentage and adipocyte size and decreased lean mass percentage and muscle fiber size relative to NBW offspring. These LBW-related changes in body composition were corrected by high-protein diet intervention. At 12 weeks of age, the fasting insulin level (7.14 ± 0.83 vs 9.27 ± 0.67 mU/L) and homeostasis model of insulin resistance (1.71 ± 0.35 vs 2.30 ± 0.44) were significantly lower in high protein–fed LBW offspring than in normal protein–fed LBW offspring. Low birth weight rat pups showed a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in serum adiponectin concentrations, glucose transporter 4 mRNA abundance, and phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) relative to NBW controls. These LBW-associated alterations in gene expression were reversed by early high-protein treatment.

Conclusions: Early postnatal high-protein intake alters the body composition and improves insulin resistance in adults with LBW, which is associated with activation of the AMPK and mTOR pathways.

© 2012 American Federation for Medical Research

Login

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.