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Journal of Hypertension:
doi: 10.1097/01.hjh.0000419850.06411.f8
S3: GLOBAL, INDIGENOUS AND ETHNIC POPULATIONS: PDF Only

24 HEALTH-RISK FACTORS AND THE PREVALENCE OF HYPERTENSION IN A THAI NATIONAL COHORT STUDY (TCS) OF STUDENTS FROM SUKOTHAI THAMMATHIRAT OPEN UNIVERSITY (STOU).

Thawornchaisit, Prasutr; de Looze, Ferdinandus; Reid, Christopher; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Sleigh, Adrian

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Abstract

Objective: Thailand is undergoing a health-risk transition which impacts chronic diseases particularly hypertension as a result of rapid transition from a developing to a developed country. This study analyzes the effect of health-risk factors such as socioeconomic status (SES), and body mass index (BMI) on the prevalence of hypertension.

Design and methods: The baseline data were obtained in 2005 from 87143 STOU students participating in the TCS (mean age 30.5 years, 54.7% female). Adjusted odds ratios of association between risk factors and hypertension were analysed across 2 age groups by sex, after controlling for the confounding factors such as age, SES, and BMI.

Results: The prevalence of hypertension in men was approximately twice as high as that in women (6.9%VS2.6%). Hypertension was associated with aging, a lower education attainment, a higher BMI and having underlying diseases in both sexes. In men, hypertension was associated with high income, spending more time on screens (TV&PC), smoking and alcohol drinking. In women, it was directly correlated with instant and roasted or smoked food consumption. Higher education was associated with lower rates of hypertension in the younger (<=40 years) men and women while household work and gardening had a benefit in older (>40 years) men. Hypertension was related with having a partner and alcohol drinking in the younger women.

Conclusion: Thai health-risk transition is in a later stage as the changing pattern is similar with that in developed countries e.g. an inverse association between education attainment and hypertension in both sexes. However, in men, smoking and drinking need to be addressed.

(C) 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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