What's Your Diagnosis?
Created:   4/22/2010
Contains:  18 items

Oral Lesions

Beyer, Donna; Torgerson, Rochelle

Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association . 8(4):283-286, July/August 2016.

ABSTRACT: Oral lesions can be a challenge to diagnose and treat. Talking, chewing, and swallowing cause friction within the mouth, making it difficult to determine the clinical appearance of the original lesion. Underlying health issues can also impact oral health so the patient health history, as well as the history and appearance of the oral lesions, is important to consider when diagnosing oral lesions. The patient presented here is a middle-aged man with oral lesions for 3 months, which severely impacted his life. This article allows the reader to identify a diagnosis based on information given, then discusses the differential diagnoses, and reveals the diagnosis and treatment plan.

Generalized Annular and Papulosquamous Eruption

Sood, Apra; Khetarpal, Shilpi; Billings, Steven D.; More

Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association . 6(1):17-19, January/February 2014.

A 72-year-old man presents with a 2-year history of a diffuse asymptomatic rash on the trunk and upper extremities. Initially, the rash was limited but has progressed over 3 months and is aggravated by sunlight. There is no associated fever, joint pain, weight loss, shortness of breath, or malaise.

What's Your Diagnosis?

Garcia-Albea, Victoria; Brouillard, Katie

Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association . 3(4):216-220, July/August 2011.

An 80-year-old male patient reported an 8-month history of a red, flat rash on his bilateral anterior lower extremities, accompanied by swelling of the ower extremities. He complained that his skin "felt thick" but was otherwise asymptomatic. One month after being diagnosed with lipodermatosclerosis by his primary care provider, he presented to dermatology. The differential diagnoses for this patient's presentation are discussed here and include nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy, systemic sclerosis, scleredema, myxedema, and morphea.

What's Your Diagnosis?: A 66-Year-Old Man With a 1-Month History of a Severely Pruritic Rash of the Back

McKeehen, Barbara

Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association . 3(2):96-99, March/April 2011.

A 66-year-old man was seen in the dermatology clinic with a 1-month history of a severely pruritic rash of the back. He reported no modifying factors affecting the rash. Treatments included topical mometasone and washing the area with dandruff shampoo, which resulted in no improvement.

What's Your Diagnosis?

McKeehen, Barbara

Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association . 3(1):46-49, January/February 2011.

A 66-year-old man was referred to the dermatology clinic for a 5-month history of slightly pruritic, bright erythematous, slightly scaly annular confluent plaques of upper chest, shoulders, and entire back. He has had several intermittent similar eruptions for 9 years, with two biopsies that showed nonspecific superficial perivascular dermatitis. He is diabetic but otherwise healthy.

What's Your Diagnosis?

Fife, Donna Poma

Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association . 2(6):273-275, November/December 2010.

A 72-year-old male patient presented with an irregular nodule with variegated brown coloration and notched borders on a sun-damaged bald scalp. He was unsure of the length of time the lesion had been present. The lesion was asymptomatic, and the patient denied any history of bleeding or drainage. Biopsy was done to confirm diagnosis.

What's Your Diagnosis?

McKeehen, Barbara

Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association . 2(5):222-225, September/October 2010.

An 88-year-old male was referred to the dermatology clinic for a 3-month history of a pruritic, painful, dry, erythematous patch of the left dorsal foot, a triangular gray patch of the pretibial region from the ankle to mid-lower leg, erythematous patches of the lateral lower leg, and 1+ edema. The patient has a history of stasis dermatitis for many years with intermittent stasis ulcers.

What's Your Diagnosis?

McKeehen, Barbara

Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association . 2(4):174-176, July/August 2010.

A 58-year-old White male was referred to the Dermatology Clinic for a 2-year history of a generalized pruritic, burning rash. A biopsy done by his primary care provider showed acute folliculitis with microabscess in the superficial dermis. Cutaneous examination revealed erythematous to violaceous macules and papules heavily distributed over the shoulders, back, and arms, and a few papules scattered on the upper chest. Erythematous macules were distributed on the penis, thighs, lower legs and dorsal feet. He has no lymphadenopathy.

What's Your Diagnosis?

McKeehen, Barbara

Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association . 2(3):131-134, May/June 2010.

A 33-year-old Caucasian woman was referred to the dermatology clinic for abscesses of the dorsal nose and left medial upper arm, which developed about 1 month prior. Earlier in the month, she presented to an emergency room, where she had incision and drainage of 7.3 ml of pus from nasal abscess and was discharged with sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Pain worsened, and she was admitted for intravenous antibiotics. Treatment was unsuccessful.

What's Your Diagnosis?

McKeehen, Barbara

Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association . 1(6):358-360, November/December 2009.

A 48-year-old Black male with bilateral above knee amputations presented with a 3 year history of multiple lesions of the thighs. One of the lesions is intermittently painful. He has a history of HIV, TB, hypertension, lymphedema, Charcot-Marie-Tooth, and recurring, severe cellulitis of stumps.

What's Your Diagnosis?

McKeehen, Barbara

Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association . 1(4):249-250, July/August 2009.

This is a case presentation with photograph of rash for reader's clinical diagnosis. Five differential diagnoses are given, with an explanation of each. Included is the patient's diagnosis, the significance of the disease, the treatment, and the recommended follow-up.