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Association Between Peripheral Muscle Strength and Daily Physical Activity in Patients With COPD: A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS

Rausch Osthoff, Anne-Kathrin MSc; Taeymans, Jan PhD; Kool, Jan PhD; Marcar, Valentine; van Gestel, Arnoldus J.R. PhD

Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation & Prevention: November/December 2013 - Volume 33 - Issue 6 - p 351–359
doi: 10.1097/HCR.0000000000000022
Scientific Review

BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have skeletal muscle dysfunction and reduced daily physical activity (PA). Whether the reduction in quadriceps strength (QS) is directly linked to physical inactivity remains to be elucidated.

METHODS: A systematic review and a meta-analysis were conducted to determine the potential relationship between QS and the level of PA. The overall estimate of the correlation coefficient (r *) was calculated, and a subgroup analysis was conducted to analyze the association between QS and indices of PA separately.

RESULTS: A total of 8 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The overall association between QS and PA was low but highly significant (r * = 0.288, 95% CI = 0.180–0.389; P < .001). In the subgroup analysis, the association between QS and the number of steps per day was low (r = 0.260; 95% CI = 0.060–0.440) and the association between QS and the time spent walking was moderate (r = 0.418; 95% CI = 0.229–0.576).

CONCLUSIONS: Peripheral muscle strength is associated with PA as assessed by the number of steps per day and the time spent walking in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The overall association between QS and PA was low to moderate and highly significant.

A meta-analysis of 8 studies was conducted to determine the potential relationship between peripheral muscle strength and the amount of physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The overall association between these 2 parameters was low but highly significant (r * = 0.288, 95% CI = 0.180–0.389; P < .001).

Department of Physiotherapy, Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW), Winterthur, Switzerland (Ms Osthoff and Drs Kool, van Gestel, and Marcar); and Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland (Dr Taeymans).

Correspondence: Anne-Kathrin Rausch Osthoff, MSc, Department of Physiotherapy, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Technikumstrasse 71, 8401 Winterthur, Switzerland (anne-kathrin.rauschosthoff@zhaw.ch).

None of the authors has a conflict of interest related to the content of the manuscript.

None of the authors received any funding.

© 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins