Skip Navigation LinksHome > November 2012 - Volume 23 - Issue 6 > Perforating Frontal Branch of the Superficial Temporal Arter...
Journal of Craniofacial Surgery:
doi: 10.1097/SCS.0b013e31826685a2
Anatomical Studies

Perforating Frontal Branch of the Superficial Temporal Artery as Related to Subcutaneous Forehead Lift

Jo, Yong Woo MD, MS*; Hwang, Kun MD, PhD; Huan, Fan RN, MS; Kim, Sang Hyun MS†‡; Han, Seung Ho MD, DMSc

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Abstract

Abstract: The aim of this study was to elucidate the precise anatomy of the perforating branch of the superficial temporal artery in relation to subcutaneous forehead lift (SFL).

Ten hemifaces of 6 fresh adult Korean cadavers were used in this study. In 4 hemifaces, following injection of red latex, dissection was performed. In 2 hemifaces, following injection of methylene blue solution into the perforator, the area of discoloration was observed. An artery perforating the frontalis muscle into skin of the forehead was identified in 18 foreheads of 9 patients who underwent SFL. Measurements were taken of the external diameter and the location of the perforator.

Perforating branches originating from the frontal branch of the superficial temporal artery, perforating the frontalis muscle into skin of the forehead, were observed in all 10 of the dissected hemifaces. Thereafter, it was referred to as the perforating frontal artery (PFA). Skin of the ipsilateral mid-forehead was discolored by methylene blue solution. Most of the PFA (83%) was included in a circle having a radius of 8.9 mm. The center of the circle was located 40.5 mm from the midline on the x axis and 53.6 mm from the supraorbital rim (on the y axis). The center of the circle was located at 89.8% of the length of the midline to the lateral canthus (x axis) and 79.1% of the length of the supraorbital rim to the hairline (y axis).

Plastic surgeons can use the PFA in order to achieve sufficient circulation of the skin flap. When surgeons are required to sacrifice the PFA in order to achieve flap mobilization, they can safely cauterize the PFA after isolation without causing accidental burn injury to the skin flap. In addition, the PFA might be useful in creation of local or distant flaps for reconstruction of the forehead or scalp.

© 2012 Mutaz B. Habal, MD

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