Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Pediatric Nasal Fractures: Evaluation and Management

Desrosiers, Arthur E. III MD; Thaller, Seth R. MD, DMD, FACS

Journal of Craniofacial Surgery: July 2011 - Volume 22 - Issue 4 - pp 1327-1329
doi: 10.1097/SCS.0b013e31821c932d
Clinical Studies

Nasal fractures have been reported as 1 of the 3 most commonly encountered pediatric facial bone fractures. The most common causes of nasal fractures in this age group are auto accidents (40%), sports injuries (25%), intended injuries (15%), and home injuries (10%). Nasal fractures are usually treated with closed reduction (Higuera S, Lee EI, Stal S. Nasal trauma and the deviated nose. Plast Reconstr Surg 2007;120:64S-75S). This results in a significant incidence of posttraumatic deformities, often requiring secondary surgical treatment. For this reason, it is paramount to pay careful attention to the underlying structural nasal anatomy during the initial diagnosis and management.

From the Division of Plastic Surgery, DeWitt Daughtry Department of Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida.

Received June 29, 2010.

Accepted for publication September 4, 2010.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Seth R. Thaller, MD, DMD, FACS, Division of Plastic Surgery, DeWitt Daughtry Department of Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, 1611 NW 12th Ave, East Tower 3019, Miami, FL 33136; E-mail: sthaller@med.miami.edu

The authors report no conflicts of interest.

© 2011 Mutaz B. Habal, MD