You could be reading the full-text of this article now if you...

If you have access to this article through your institution,
you can view this article in

Soccer-Related Facial Fractures: Postoperative Management With Facial Protective Shields

Procacci, Pasquale MD; Ferrari, Francesca MD, DDS; Bettini, Giordana MD; Bissolotti, Guido MD; Trevisiol, Lorenzo MD; Nocini, Pier Francesco MD, DDS

Journal of Craniofacial Surgery:
doi: 10.1097/SCS.0b013e3181909c55
Original Articles
Abstract

Facial fractures are one of the most common orofacial injury sustained during participation in sporting events.

The frequency of maxillofacial lesions varies according to the popularity that each sport has in a particular country. Soccer is the most popular sport in Italy, and it is responsible for a large number of facial traumas.

Traumas and fractures in soccer mainly involve the zygomatic and nasal regions and are especially caused by direct contact that takes place mainly when the ball is played with the forehead. In particular, elbow-head and head-head impacts are the most frequent dangerous contacts.

Soccer is not a violent sport, and the use of protective helmets is not allowed because it could be dangerous especially when players play the ball with the head. The use of protective facial shields are exclusively permitted to preserve players who underwent surgery for facial fractures.

The use of a facial protection mask after a facial fracture treatment has already been reported. This article describes a clinical experience of management of 4 soccer-related facial fractures by means of fabrication of individual facial protective shields.

Author Information

From the Department of Maxillo-Facial Surgery and Dentistry, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.

Received July 23, 2008.

Accepted for publication Aug. 11, 2008.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Pasquale Procacci, MD, Department of Maxillo-Facial Surgery and Dentistry, University of Verona, Policlinico "Giovanni Battista Rossi," Piazzale Ludovico Antonio Scuro, 10, 37134 Verona, Italy; E-mail: pasqualeprocacci@hotmail.com

© 2009 Mutaz B. Habal, MD