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Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing:
doi: 10.1097/JCN.0000000000000146
Feature Article: PDF Only

10-Year Risk for Cardiovascular Disease Among Male Workers in Small-Sized Industries.

Park, Kyongok PhD, RN; Hwang, Seon Young PhD, RN

Published Ahead-of-Print
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Abstract

Background: Health management or health promotion programs are limited, particularly for workers in small-sized industries.

Objectives: This study aimed to identify the 10-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk using the general Framingham Risk Score and examine predictors of CVD risk adjusted for age among male workers.

Methods: Routine health screening data and self-reported questionnaires were collected from 12 933 male workers in 1041 industries from 2009 to 2011 in South Korea.

Results: The proportion of high CVD risk (Framingham Risk Score >20%) was 7.1% (n = 919). Most (83.5%) subjects were manufacturing workers, engaged in manual labor, with a mean (SD) age of 42.1 (9.2) years (range, 30-70 years). Younger workers were more likely to smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol heavily, and be physically inactive. A logistic regression analysis showed that after adjusting for age, occupation type, body mass index, physical activity, and alcohol consumption were significant predictors of 10-year CVD risk.

Conclusion: To reduce CVD risk, education regarding lifestyle modification should be emphasized for small-sized industrial workers who are overweight, physically inactive, and heavy alcohol drinkers and who work as bus or taxi drivers. Careful attention is also needed for younger workers who are a latent risk group for the development of CVD.

Copyright (C) 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved

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