Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Liver MRI at 3.0 Tesla: Comparison of Image Quality and Lesion Detectability Between Single-Source Conventional and Dual-Source Parallel Radiofrequency Transmissions

Hwang, Jiyoung MD; Kim, Young Kon MD, PhD; Park, Min Jung MD, PhD; Lee, Mi Hee MD; Kim, Seong Hyun MD, PhD; Lee, Won Jae MD, PhD; Choi, Dongil MD, PhD

Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography: September/October 2012 - Volume 36 - Issue 5 - p 546–553
doi: 10.1097/RCT.0b013e318264e4a7
Abdominal Imaging

Objective To prospectively and intraindividually compare liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using single-source and dual-source parallel radiofrequency (RF) transmissions at 3.0-T for image quality, lesion detectability, and lesion contrast.

Methods Ninety-nine patients with 139 liver lesions underwent liver MRI at 3.0-T. Two radiologists performed a consensus review of T2-weighted images (T2WI), heavily T2WI (HT2WI), gadoxetic acid–enhanced hepatobiliary images, and diffusion-weighted imaging using single-source and dual-source RF transmissions with regard to image quality and lesion detectability. Contrast ratios between liver lesions and liver parenchyma were also calculated.

Results Image quality was better with dual-source than with single-source at T2WI and HT2WI (P < 0.05), but lesion detectabilities were similar for all sequences. There was no significant difference in mean contrast ratios for all sequences (P > 0.05).

Conclusion Dual-source RF transmission provides a better image quality with T2WI and HT2WI than with single-source. However, 2 techniques showed similar lesion detectability.

From the Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Dr Hwang is currently in the Department of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

Received for publication April 13, 2012; accepted June 15, 2012.

Reprints: Young Kon Kim, MD, PhD, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea (e-mail: jmyr@dreamwiz.com).

The authors report no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.