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Organizing Pneumonia in Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: CT Features in 16 Patients

Pipavath, Sudhakar N. J. MD*; Chung, Jonathan H. MD; Chien, Jason W. MD; Godwin, J. David MD§

Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography: July/August 2012 - Volume 36 - Issue 4 - p 431–436
doi: 10.1097/RCT.0b013e31825ba274
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Imaging

Purpose: To evaluate computed tomographic (CT) scans of patients with organizing pneumonia (OP) complicating hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

Materials and Methods: A review of patients who underwent HSCT at our institution identified 16 patients who had documented OP on biopsy. Computed tomographic scans were reviewed by 2 thoracic radiologists.

Results: Ground glass opacities (GGO) were seen in 15 patients, consolidation in 8 patients, linear opacities in 8 patients, traction bronchiectasis in 2 patients, and septal thickening in 2 patients. Ground glass opacity was the dominant abnormality in 7 patients, consolidation in 4 patients, and linear opacities in 5 patients. Peribronchovascular distribution was found in 4 patients, peripheral in 2 patients, diffuse in 3 patients; upper lung predominance was found in 10 patients, and lower lung predominance in 5 patients.

Conclusion: The principal computed tomographic features of OP after HSCT are ground glass opacities, consolidation and linear opacities, with upper lung predominance. Allowing for a possible sampling bias, these findings differ from those reported in cryptogenic OP and OP from other causes.

From the *Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; †Department of Radiology, Academic affairs, National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, CO; and ‡Department of Medicine, and §Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Received for publication February 6, 2012; accepted April 16, 2012.

Reprints: Sudhakar N.J. Pipavath, MD, Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific St, No. 357115, Seattle, WA (e-mail: snjp@u.washington.edu).

The authors report no conflicts of interest.

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.