Skip Navigation LinksHome > January/February 2011 - Volume 35 - Issue 1 > Gadolinium-Enhanced Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a...
Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography:
doi: 10.1097/RCT.0b013e3181f3d57e
Original Articles

Gadolinium-Enhanced Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a 2-Point Dixon Fat-Water Separation Technique: Impact Upon Image Quality and Lesion Detection

Rosenkrantz, Andrew B. MD; Mannelli, Lorenzo MD; Kim, Sungheon PhD; Babb, James S. PhD

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Abstract

Purpose: To compare image quality and lesion detection in postcontrast liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences that achieve fat suppression via chemically selective fat saturation (FS-VIBE) and a 2-point Dixon water-fat separation method (Dixon-VIBE).

Materials and Methods: Thirty patients underwent contrast-enhanced liver MRI at 1.5 T in which Dixon-VIBE was performed immediately after a delayed FS-VIBE. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed the sequences for a variety of qualitative and quantitative image quality measures and for lesion detection.

Results: Dixon-VIBE received nearly perfect scores for strength and homogeneity of fat suppression that were significantly better than scores for FS-VIBE, with an associated significant improvement in liver-fat contrast (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Dixon-VIBE also received significantly better scores for sharpness of intrahepatic vessels (P = 0.0029) and overall image quality (P < 0.0001). Despite a slightly longer acquisition time for Dixon-VIBE, there was no significant difference in motion artifact (P = 0.3877). There was no significant difference for sensitivity, positive predictive value, or contrast relative to background liver for focal lesions (P = 0.448, P = 0.347, and P = 0.2312, respectively).

Conclusions: For postcontrast liver MRI, Dixon-VIBE demonstrated significantly improved fat suppression. Various assessments of lesion detection showed no significant difference between sequences.

© 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

 

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