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Ambulatory Total Shoulder Arthroplasty: A Comprehensive Analysis of Current Trends, Complications, Readmissions, and Costs

Cancienne, Jourdan M. MD1; Brockmeier, Stephen F. MD1; Gulotta, Lawrence V. MD2; Dines, David M. MD2; Werner, Brian C. MD1,a

Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery - American Volume: 19 April 2017 - Volume 99 - Issue 8 - p 629–637
doi: 10.2106/JBJS.16.00287
Scientific Articles
Disclosures

Background: There have been few studies that have evaluated ambulatory total shoulder arthroplasty. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the current trends in ambulatory total shoulder arthroplasty in the United States; to characterize the rate of postoperative complications, hospital readmission, and risk factors associated with readmission; and to conduct a cost analysis comparing ambulatory total shoulder arthroplasty with matched inpatient total shoulder arthroplasty.

Methods: A national insurance database was queried for patients who underwent anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty between the fourth quarter of 2010 and 2014. Patients undergoing ambulatory total shoulder arthroplasty and a matched group of patients undergoing inpatient total shoulder arthroplasty were identified. Complications were assessed for both groups. Risk factors for readmission within 90 days postoperatively were examined. The costs up to 30 days postoperatively were evaluated for patients who underwent ambulatory total shoulder arthroplasty and controls.

Results: Included in the study were 706 patients who underwent ambulatory total shoulder arthroplasty. From the fourth quarter of 2010 to 2014, the yearly incidence of ambulatory total shoulder arthroplasty doubled. In the study, 4,459 patients who underwent inpatient total shoulder arthroplasty were matched to patients who underwent ambulatory total shoulder arthroplasty. In no instances were any complications present at a significantly higher rate in the patients who underwent ambulatory total shoulder arthroplasty. The rate of readmission was not significantly different (p > 0.05) between the 2 cohorts. The patients undergoing ambulatory total shoulder arthroplasty had significantly lower costs (p < 0.0001) at $14,722 compared with the matched controls at $18,336 in numerous itemized cost categories as well as costs related to diagnosis-related groups.

Conclusions: In appropriately selected patients, ambulatory total shoulder arthroplasty is a viable and safe practice model. Ambulatory total shoulder arthroplasty also offers significant cost savings compared with inpatient total shoulder arthroplasty in matched patients.

Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia

2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

E-mail address for B.C. Werner: Bcw4x@virginia.edu

Copyright 2017 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated
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