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Quality of Life Following Femoral Head-Neck Osteochondroplasty for Femoroacetabular Impingement

Beaulé, Paul E. MD, FRCSC; Le Duff, Michel J. MA; Zaragoza, Edward MD

Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery - American Volume: April 2007 - Volume 89 - Issue 4 - p 773–779
doi: 10.2106/JBJS.F.00681
Scientific Articles

Background: Femoroacetabular impingement has been recently described as a common cause of hip pain and labral tears in young adults. We evaluated the early clinical results and quality of life after osteochondroplasty of the femoral head-neck junction for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement.

Methods: Thirty-seven hips in thirty-four patients with persistent hip pain and a mean age of 40.5 years underwent surgical dislocation of the hip and osteochondroplasty of the femoral head-neck junction for the treatment of camtype femoroacetabular impingement. All of the patients had had preoperative evidence of pathological changes in the labrum on imaging. The clinical course and the quality of life were assessed postoperatively.

Results: The mean score on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) increased from 61.2 points preoperatively to 81.4 points at a mean of 3.1 years postoperatively (p < 0.001), the mean University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) activity score increased from 4.8 to 7.5 points (p < 0.001), the mean Short Form-12 (SF-12) physical component score increased from 37.3 to 45.6 points (p < 0.001), and the mean SF-12 mental component score increased from 46.4 to 51.2 points (p = 0.031). None of the hips underwent additional reconstructive surgery. There were no cases of osteonecrosis. Nine patients underwent screw removal from the greater trochanter because of persistent bursitis. Six of the thirty-four patients were dissatisfied with the outcome.

Conclusions: Cam-type femoroacetabular impingement is associated with insufficient concavity at the anterolateral head-neck junction and with pathological changes in the labrum. Osteochondroplasty of the femoral head-neck junction following surgical dislocation of the hip joint is safe and effective and can provide a significant improvement in the overall quality of life of most patients.

Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

1 Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ottawa, Ottawa Hospital General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Suite 5004, Ottawa, ON K1H 8L6, Canada

2 Joint Replacement Institute, Orthopaedic Hospital, 2400 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, CA 90007

3 Department of Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California at Los Angeles, 1250 16th Street, Santa Monica, CA 90404

Copyright 2007 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated
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