Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Osteogenic Sarcoma: A STUDY OF SIX HUNDRED CASES.

DAHLIN, DAVID C.; COVENTRY, MARK B.
Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery - American Volume: January 1967
Archive: PDF Only

Of 600 patients with pathologically verified osteogenic sarcoma (exclusive of tumors of the jaws and parosteal osteogenic sarcoma), 410 were eligible for five-year follow-up and 408 were traced. Of the 408 patients, eighty-three (20.3 per cent) survived more than five years. The survival rate (17.1 per cent) for patients whose tumors were predominantly osteoblastic was lower, but not to a statistically significant degree, than the rate for those with chondroblastic or fibroblastic tumors. More than 25 per cent of those with tumors in the more readily treatable sites, namely distal to the proximal end of the humerus or femur, survived five years. Sex had little bearing on prognosis. The more anaplastic sarcomata were associated with a poorer prognosis than the average, but again the difference was not statistically significant. Two patients survived long intervals after resection for pulmonary metastasis.

Twenty of the 600 patients had osteogenic sarcoma that developed in lesions of Paget's disease, and three of these became long-term survivors. Sixteen had osteogenic sarcoma that arose in bones that had been irradiated previously; none of these survived more than three years. The possibility of multicentric origin of osteogenic sarcoma arose in sixteen patients.

It is concluded that vigorous, prompt treatment should be employed for osteogenic sarcoma and a gratifying number of survivors obtained.

Copyright 1967 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated

You currently do not have access to this article

To access this article: