Cineplasty: An End-Result Study.

BRAV, ERNEST A.; SPITTLER, AUGUST W.; LUSOMBE, HAROLD B.; KUITERT, JOHN H.; MACDONALD, WILLIM F.; VULTEE, FREDERICK E. JR.; WOODARD, GEORGE H.; FLETCHER, MAURICE J.; LEONARD, FRED
Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery - American Volume:
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Abstract

1. An end-result study of seventy-eight biceps cineplasties and twenty-nine pectoral cineplasties reveals that 61.7 per cent of the patients were wearing their prostheses at the end of a year or more. In the biceps-cineplasty group the percentage was 73.1 and in the pectoral-cineplasty group it was 31.0.

2. Cinreplasty should be performed only at established amputation centers where all the members of the clinic team can participate in the proper selection of patients, where there are surgeons familiar with the operative procedure, where training supervision by experienced physiatrists is available, and where the fitting can be done by prosthetists who understand the peculiar problems of the cineplasty amputee. There must also be provision for subsequent specialized prosthetic maintenance.

3. Cineplasty operations should be limited to carefully selected patients. The local conidition of the stump, the desire and motivation of the patient for the procedure, and the functional requirements of the patient should all he taken into consideration.

4. When these requirements are met, the advantages of the biceps-cineplasty procedure to the below-the-elbow amputee are sufficiently great so that the operation should be offered to him. The advantages of biceps cineplasty to the long above-the-elbow amputee are not so apparent, and the usefulness of this procedure remains controversial.

5. At present pectoral cineplasty has limited usefulness. It should be employed only in patients with such exceptional conditions as bilateral shoulder disarticulation; in such a patient an additional source of prosthetic control is urgently required.

6. Cineplasty is not advisable in amputee patients prior to adolescence, and it is not usually cosmetically acceptable to women.

Copyright 1957 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated