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TENSILE STRENGTH OF THE ANTERIOR LONGITUDINAL LIGAMENT IN RELATION TO TREATMENT OF 132 CRUSH FRACTURES OF THE SPINE.

DAVIS, ARTHUR G.
The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery: April 1938
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There is more certainty regarding return to former occupation in the average uncomplicated crush fracture than there is in the case of fracture of a long bone. Reductions are more complete, union more certain, and malunion well nigh impossible. There is no threat of soft-part interposition.

At present the complete treatment of a simple crush fracture is less time-consuming and involves less work than most long-bone fractures. Present practice allows the dependable patient to leave the hospital in a day or two to spend six weeks recumbent at home. Three or four after-calls suffice to restore him to his former occupation. This sequence is rapidly becoming average.

Tensile-strength and elasticity tests indicate competence of the anterior longitudinal ligament far beyond the necessary strength required for reduction by hyperextension. Additional proof of adequacy is afforded by the 132 cases in which reduction was accomplished without evidence of damage.

(C) 1938 All Rights Reserved.The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.

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