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FRACTURES AND DISLOCATIONS ABOUT THE SHOULDER.

FUNSTEN, ROBERT V.; KINSER, PRENTICE
The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery: January 1936
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1. From the information and experience derived from the reduction, fixation, and after-care of sixty-four cases of injury about the shoulder joint, including fractures and dislocations, conservative treatment is urged.

2. Axillary-view roentgenograms are helpful in more clearly understanding the problem involved in reduction.

3. After reduction, the treatment of fractures and dislocations of the shoulder by casts or splints with the arm in the abducted position is unnecessary in most cases and contra-indicated in many.

4. X-rays taken from any one angle should not be relied upon for the diagnosis of acromioclavicular dislocations.

5. After reduction, the primary use of the Velpeau bandage or swathe with the elbow well across the chest., followed by a neck-wrist strap and early exercises, tends to promote the maximum recovery of motion and function in the shoulder joint in the shortest time.

(C) 1936 All Rights Reserved.The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.

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