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THE USE OF COLLOIDAL SULPHUR IN THE TREATMENT OF ARTHRITIS.

WHEELDON, THOMAS
The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery: July 1935
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1. An explanation of part of the problem of arthritis may lie in the study of sulphur.

2. The intravenous and intragluteal administration of colloidal sulphur (Sulfur-Diasporal) is practically without reaction.

3. The study of fifty cases of arthritis (twenty-five of the hypertrophic type and twenty-five of the proliferative type), treated with colloidal sulphur (intravenous and intragluteal), seemed to indicate:

a. An apparent improvement in the subjective symptoms and objective signs.

b. An increase in the cystine content of the finger nails.

c. The possibility of some degree of stabilization of the blood calcium.

d. A small decrease in the blood sugar.

e. An average slight rise in the metabolic rate, with most improvement in those cases with low metabolic rates.

f. A fall in the sedimentation rate.

g. An increased appearance of indican in the urine.

h. No significant effect upon the red blood cells.

i. A slight fall in the white blood count.

j. A slight fall in the hemoglobin.

k. A fall in the blood pressure.

l. A fall in the pulse pressure.

m. A tendency to weight reduction.

n. No marked temperature changes.

o. An x-ray indication of no progress of the disease.

4. The study of 341 cases of arthritis (hypertrophic and proliferative) showed an average rise of 1.62 per cent. in the cystine content of the finger nails following treatment with colloidal sulphur.

5. The study of 892 cases of arthritis (hypertrophic and proliferative) indicated that improvement in the subjective symptoms and objective signs may be expected following treatment with colloidal sulphur.

(C) 1935 All Rights Reserved.The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.

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