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THE USE OF THE JONES SPLINT IN THE TREATMENT OF FRACTURE OF THE PELVIS AND OF THE NECK OF THE FEMUR: A Series of Forty Cases.

LANGAN, A. J.
The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery: April 1935
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The Jones splint has the following advantages:

1. Mortality is greatly reduced, as may be seen in the author's series of cases in which five deaths occurred, giving a mortality rate of 12.5 per cent., which is much better than in his past experience with other procedures.

2. Hospital costs are made appreciably smaller. After the fracture has been reduced, the patient is easily cared for at home, unless complications make more constant care necessary.

TABLE I [SEE TABLE I IN SOURCE PDF] [SEE FIG.3 FIG.4 IN SOURCE PDF] [SEE FIG.5 FIG.6 IN SOURCE PDF]

3. Handling the patient for use of the bedpan or for a change of bed linen is simple, especially with the aid of the overhead frame by which the patient may raise himself.

4. Because of the ease in handling the patient, bed sores are rare. Since there is no plaster above the knees, there is, of course, no chance for urine or faeces to filter in between the skin and the cast and set up irritation.

5. The free motion permitted is important, especially in the treatment of the aged where hypostasis so frequently follows long convalescence in plaster casts.

6. The mental condition of the patient using the Jones splint has been found to be much better than that of the patient immobilized in a body cast such as the Whitman technique requires. When the Jones splint is used, the patient may be placed in a wheel chair and allowed in the sun the first week after the cast is applied.

7. The splint is easily applied by any general practitioner.

(C) 1935 All Rights Reserved.The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.

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