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INTERNAL DERANGEMENT OF KNEE JOINT.

WALLACE, JAMES O.; PERMAR, H. H.
The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery: October 1927
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1. Tender areas at site of pannus formation are signs of trouble within the joint.

2. Lack of complete extension is the most important sign in internal derangement of the knee joint.

3. Many patients have knee joints which have accommodated themselves to weakness and are in a position of slight locking all the time, as evidenced by lack of complete extension.

4. A misplaced or hypertrophied semilunar cartilage or fat pad is a foreign body which acts as an irritant, which will produce a vicious pathologic cycle leading to destruction of the joint.

5. Careful and repeated examination is necessary in making a diagnosis of internal derangement of knee joint.

6. Removal of the offending objects is the surest way to effect a cure.

(C) 1927 All Rights Reserved.The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.

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