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UNUNITED FRACTURES WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE CHEMISTRY OF THE BLOOD.

HENDERSON, MELVIN S.; NOBLE, THOMAS P.; SANDIFORD, KATHLEEN
The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery: July 1926
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The failure of a fracture to unite is difficult to explain. That it may in certain instances be due to constitutional causes is hardly to be doubted. Investigation to determine this factor is to be commended and constitutional methods of treatment should be used as a routine in addition to surgical methods. Study of the calcium and phosphorus content of the blood, if carried out from the investigative standpoint, may prove of value in the future although in routine work it rarely leads to information of clinical value. Successful treatment of the average run of ununited fractures is in the great majority of cases a surgical problem and depends much more frequently on correct surgical technic than on methods directed toward overcoming the as yet unknown constitutional or chemical factors concerned in ossification.

(C) 1926 All Rights Reserved.The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.

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