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OSTEOMYELITIS FOLLOWING WAR INJURIES: Based on the Study of 61 Cases.

STEPHENS, RICHMOND
The Journal of Orthopedic Surgery: April 1921
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1. Chronic Osteomyelitis is seen in a seriously large number of patients who have had bone injuries.

2. It is extremely chronic in its course and it is practically impossible to determine when a case is cured as some may lightup many years after they have been considered finished.

3. Efficient early treatment would lessen the chances of this chronic condition or possibly entirely prevent it.

4. That the methods tried in the real chronic stage are not very satisfactory, is evidenced by the large number and the variable results claimed, and the fact that we still see so many uncured cases.

5. Operative treatment is indicated in practically all of the cases.

6. The aims in the treatment are:

(a) To remove any remaining foreign bodies, sequestra, etc.

(b) To remove the infection.

(c) To obliterate the cavity.

(d) To fill in the space.

7. The space is filled most satisfactorily by the overlying soft parts if the trough can be made in a situation where plenty of tissue is available. If flaps are necessary muscle has been found best.

8. Conservative treatment rather than radical should be employed.

(C) 1921 All Rights Reserved.The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc.

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