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JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes:
doi: 10.1097/01.qai.0000434954.65620.f3
Implementation and Operational Research: Epidemiology and Prevention

Integration and Task Shifting for TB/HIV Care and Treatment in Highly Resource-Scarce Settings: One Size May Not Fit All

Van Rie, Annelies MD, PhD*; Patel, Monita R. MPH*; Nana, Mbonze MD, MPH; Vanden Driessche, Koen MD*; Tabala, Martine BS; Yotebieng, Marcel MD, PhD*,†; Behets, Frieda PhD*

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Author Information

*Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; and

School of Public Health, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Correspondence to: Annelies Van Rie, MD, PhD, 2104F McGavran Greenberg Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7534 (e-mail: vanrie@email.unc.edu).

Supported by US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Global AIDS Program (www.cdc.gov/globalaids; grant number: U62/CCU422422) and the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (http://www.pepfar.gov; grant number: 5U2GPS001179-01), with additional support from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria (http://www.theglobalfund.org/en).

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

A.V.R. worked closely with F.B. to conceive and design the study and wrote the final paper. M.R.P. analyzed the data and worked closely with A.V.R. to write the first draft of the paper. M.N., K.V.D., M.T., and M.Y. implemented the study, including patient enrollment, data collection, and clinical supervision and follow-up. All authors reviewed and contributed to the final paper.

Received August 28, 2013

Accepted August 28, 2013

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Abstract

Background: A crucial question in managing HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis (TB) concerns when and how to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART). The effectiveness of CD4-stratified ART initiation in a nurse-centered, integrated TB/HIV program at primary care in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, was assessed.

Methods: Prospective cohort study was conducted to assess the effect of CD4-stratified ART initiation by primary care nurses (513 TB patients, August 2007 to November 2009). ART was to be initiated at 1 month of TB treatment if CD4 count is <100 cells per cubic millimeter, at 2 months if CD4 count is 100–350 cells per cubic millimeter, and at the end of TB treatment after CD4 count reassessment if CD4 count is >350 cells per cubic millimeter. ART uptake and mortality were compared with a historical prospective cohort of 373 HIV-infected TB patients referred for ART to a centralized facility and 3577 HIV-negative TB patients (January 2006 to May 2007).

Results: ART uptake increased (17%–69%, P < 0.0001) and mortality during TB treatment decreased (20.1% vs 9.8%, P < 0.0003) after decentralized, nurse-initiated, CD4-stratified ART. Mortality among TB patients with CD4 count >100 cells per cubic millimeter was similar to that of HIV-negative TB patients (5.6% vs 6.3%, P = 0.65), but mortality among those with CD4 count <100 cells per cubic millimeter remained high (18.8%).

Conclusions: Nurse-centered, CD4-stratified ART initiation at primary care level was effective in increasing timely ART uptake and reducing mortality among TB patients but may not be adequate to prevent mortality among those presenting with severe immunosuppression. Further research is needed to determine the optimal management at primary care level of TB patients with CD4 counts <100 cells per cubic millimeter.

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INTRODUCTION

Tuberculosis (TB) remains an important public health problem with 8.6 million new cases and 1.3 million deaths in 2012.1 HIV has a profound impact on the TB epidemic, especially in Africa where an estimated 43% of people with TB are HIV infected.1

Despite the overwhelming evidence of reduced mortality in people with TB receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), only 57% of HIV-infected TB patients initiated ART in 2012 and ART initiation is often delayed in patients with TB.1,2 Important obstacles to ART initiation include health-care provider concerns that concomitant treatment may result in increased risk of drug side effects and drug interactions, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), and poor adherence because of the high pill burden.3,4

Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have convincingly demonstrated the benefit of early ART initiation in TB patients with CD4 count <50 cells per cubic millimeter. Questions remain about how to implement RCT findings into practice and the optimal ART timing for patients with CD4 counts >50 cells per cubic millimeter.5–7 Timely ART initiation in patients with TB requires integration of TB and HIV care, which has been challenging to achieve.8 TB treatment services are typically decentralized using a nurse-centered approach, whereas ART remains predominantly doctor centered and centralized.9 Although studies have demonstrated the benefit of task shifting for ART initiation,10,11 task shifting for integrated TB/HIV care has not yet been rigorously evaluated.

We performed a prospective study to evaluate nurse-centered, integrated TB/HIV treatment using a CD4-stratified ART timing strategy at primary care in the highly resource-scarce setting of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

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METHODS

Setting

We purposefully selected 5 clinics among the 65 primary care clinics providing TB treatment in Kinshasa. To comply with the legal requirement in the DRC that a physician initiates ART, we selected among the 24 clinics with a physician on-site at least once weekly.12 Among these, we selected clinics that routinely offered provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling for TB patients, had moderate to high patient volumes, and, to ensure local buy-in, clinics where the director was supportive of nurse-centered ART for TB patients. Primary care nurses with operational TB/HIV research experience were trained in general HIV care and initiation and monitoring of ART. Each study nurse was assigned to one clinic and worked together with the clinic TB nurse to provide integrated TB/HIV care.

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Routine Care, Data Collection, and Study Procedures

Patients were diagnosed with TB and HIV by the routine clinic nurse using national DRC diagnostic algorithms. Persons presenting with symptoms suggestive of TB were assessed by the TB nurse using smear microscopy. Smear-negative or extrapulmonary TB was diagnosed by clinical assessment, repeat smear microscopy, and response to antibiotic treatment. All TB patients were offered provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling using 2 rapid tests. Culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, chest x-ray, and CD4 count were not routinely available.

Between August 2007 and November 2009, patients diagnosed with TB and HIV were offered participation in the Integrated Tuberculosis and Antiretroviral Treatment (ITART) study. After written consent, we collected sociodemographic and clinical data, performed a clinical examination and World Health Organization (WHO) clinical staging, and collected blood sample for CD4 count, full blood count, and alanine transferase. CD4 count was repeated before completion of TB treatment.

ART eligibility was based on clinical staging and CD4 count, in line with the 2006 WHO recommendations. ART was initiated at 1 month after the start of TB treatment if baseline CD4 count was below 100 cells per cubic millimeter and in patients with a clinical stage 4 illness other than extrapulmonary TB. ART was initiated 2 months after the start of TB treatment if CD4 count was between 100 and 350 cells per cubic millimeter. For patients with baseline CD4 count >350 cells per cubic millimeter, ART eligibility was reassessed at the end of TB treatment. When reagents for CD4 counts were not available at the national HIV reference laboratory (only laboratory with CD4 count capacity in Kinshasa during the study period), all TB patients were considered ART eligible.

The study nurse booked an on-site physician consultation at the time of the physician clinic visit scheduled closest to the proposed ART start date for every ART-eligible participant. The ART regimen consisted of stavudine, lamivudine, and efavirenz. Nevirapine was substituted by efavirenz for pregnant women and zidovudine by stavudine in cases of preexisting peripheral neuropathy. The presence of alanine transferase ≥3 times upper normal limit was considered a contraindication for ART initiation. At the ART initiation assessment visit, the study nurse and physician sequentially blinded from one another and completed a standardized ART eligibility and regimen selection form. Subsequently, the nurse and physician jointly made a final decision.

During the first 2 months of TB treatment, patients received their TB medication and morning ART dose under direct observation by the clinic TB nurse during weekdays and self-administered at home during weekends. All ART evening doses were self-administered at home. During the TB treatment continuation phase, patients collected TB and antiretroviral drugs from the TB clinic on a weekly and monthly basis, respectively. Patients who were more than 3 days late for a scheduled clinic visit were traced by phone or home visit.

At each study visit (weekly during intensive phase, monthly during continuation phase), the study nurse assessed the patient for new AIDS-defining illnesses, signs and symptoms suggestive of IRIS, adverse drug reactions, and adherence to medications by self-reported frequency of pill taking during the previous 4 days. Laboratory and radiographic examinations were only performed if clinically indicated. Severity of adverse events was classified using the Division of AIDS classification.13 Patients with grade 1 toxicities were managed by the study nurse, a physician consultation was booked for grade 2 and 3 toxicities, and the patient was referred for same-day physician assessment in case of grade 4 toxicity.

After completion of TB treatment, patients were referred to the nearest ART clinic for continuation of HIV care.

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Data Analysis and Definitions

To assess the effectiveness of task shifting, integration of ART initiation into TB care at primary care clinics, and CD4 count–stratified ART initiation in increasing ART uptake and decreasing mortality, we compared results of the ITART cohort with a historical prospective cohort. This historical cohort consisted of patients starting TB treatment between January 2006 and May 2007 (pre-ITART) at 4 of the 5 clinics participating in the ITART study. Patients participating in the historical cohort received the same routine services as the ITART study cohort participants with regard to diagnosis and treatment of TB, provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling at the TB clinic, and initiation of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-infected patients; but HIV-infected patients were referred to a centralized ART facility instead of receiving integrated ART.14

We defined the follow-up period for time-to-event analyses from study enrollment to TB treatment completion. Patients were censored at loss to follow-up, death, or 8 months after the start of TB treatment, the TB treatment duration for patients with a history of TB.

The complement of Kaplan–Meier survival curves was generated to estimate cumulative mortality during TB treatment stratified by baseline CD4 count category. Differences between groups were tested using the log-rank test.

Potential risk factors for mortality were assessed using Cox proportional hazard models and expressed as crude hazard ratio (HR) and adjusted HR (adj-HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Adherence was categorized as high if the patient did not miss any clinic-based directly observed treatment visit and self-reported frequency of pill taking was “always” at all study visits; suboptimal if the patient self-reported frequency of pill taking was “never,” “sometimes,” or “most of the time” at any study visit; and default if the patient missed study visits during TB treatment. Patients with both extrapulmonary and pulmonary TB were categorized as having extrapulmonary TB. Anemia was defined as mild, moderate, and severe if hemoglobin (grams per deciliter) was 11.0–11.9, 8.0–10.9, and <8.0 for nonpregnant women; 10.0–10.9, 7.0–9.9, and <7.0 for pregnant women; and 1.10–12.9, 8.0–10.9, and <80 for men, respectively.15

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Ethics and Protection of Human Subjects

The study was approved by the institutional review boards of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Kinshasa. All patients provided written informed consent for study participation.

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RESULTS

ITART Study Population

A total of 599 patients with TB and HIV were enrolled in the ITART study. Only 3 eligible patients refused participation. We sequentially excluded patients <18 years of age (n = 31), those enrolled >30 days after the start of TB treatment (n = 19), and those on ART at enrollment (n = 36).

Among the 513 patients included in the analysis, enrollment occurred after a median of 2 days [interquartile range (IQR), 0–5] of TB treatment. Median age was 38 years (IQR, 32–45), 59.1% were female, 45.8% were married, 70.2% completed secondary education, and 75.1% walked to the clinic (Table 1). Financial insecurity was high with 53.0% being unemployed and 92.2% not having enough money to meet their needs most of the time. One in 4 patients (25.7%) had a history of TB treatment. Median body mass index was 18.0 (IQR, 16.6–19.9), and 56.7% of patients were underweight (body mass index, <18.5). Overall, 85.0% of patients had anemia at baseline and 18.1% had severe anemia.

Table 1
Table 1
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Participants were diagnosed with smear-positive pulmonary TB (39.7%), smear-negative TB (40.0%), and extrapulmonary TB (20.3%). Smear-negative pulmonary TB was more frequent as CD4 count category decreased (P < 0.0001), ranging from 24.5% among patients with CD4 count >350 to 53.9% among those with CD4 count 50–100 cells per cubic millimeter. Most common sites of extrapulmonary TB were the pleura (47.1%) and lymph nodes (34.6%); 42.3% (n = 44) also had pulmonary involvement. Six patients had documented multidrug-resistant TB.

Diagnosis of HIV infection was made at the time of TB diagnosis in most (90.5%) patients. Almost all (92.2%) had CD4 testing done within 2 weeks of study enrollment; baseline CD4 count was missing in 37 (7.2%) patients because of lack of reagents. Median baseline CD4 count was 165 cells per cubic millimeter (IQR, 82–307).

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Historical Prospective Cohort Population

The median age (38.1 years), proportion female (62.1%), proportion smear negative (37.4%), and proportion extrapulmonary tuberculosis (23.4%) among HIV-infected patients in the historical cohort were similar to that in the ITART cohort.

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ART Eligibility and ART Initiation

Of the 513 ITART patients, 419 (81.7%) were eligible for ART initiation during TB treatment. About one-third (27.7%, n = 142) were eligible for ART initiation at 1 month of TB treatment based on CD4 cell count <100 cells per cubic millimeter (n = 140) or WHO clinical stage 4 (n = 2, both Kaposi sarcoma). Another 37 were eligible for early ART because of lack of CD4 count within the first 21 days of enrollment. Almost half (46.8%, n = 240) were eligible for ART initiation at 2 months because of CD4 cell count between 100 and 350 cells per cubic millimeter.

Overall, 354 (69.0%) ITART participants initiated ART during TB treatment (Fig. 1). Among those ART eligible at month 1 of TB treatment, 136 (75.1%) participants started ART during TB treatment, after a median of 35 days (IQR, 29–49). The proportion starting ART was similar among those with CD4 cell count <50 and CD4 cell count 50–99 (78.2% vs 85.4%, P = 0.38). Median time to ART was also similar in both the groups (34 days). Among those ART eligible at month 2 of TB treatment, 206 (85.8%) participants started ART during TB treatment, after a median of 63 days (IQR, 57–74). Among the 94 patients with baseline CD4 count >350 cells per cubic millimeter, 65 (69.1%) were reassessed by CD4 count before the end of TB treatment. Of them, 22 (33.8%) participants were eligible to initiate ART based on CD4 count <350, of which 8 (36.4%) initiated ART after a median of 178 days (IQR, 107–200) after TB treatment initiation.

Figure 1
Figure 1
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CD4 data count for patients in the historical cohort was not available. Among the 373 HIV-positive TB patients, only 16.6% initiated ART during TB treatment after referral to a centralized ART clinic.

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Nurse and Physician ART Decision Making

Records of both nurse and physician ART decision making were available for 375 participants, including 349 (84.1%) patients ART eligible at baseline. Nurses and physicians were in agreement for almost all patients regarding the decision on ART initiation (98.1%) and the ART regimen to be initiated (95.3%).

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Outcomes of Decentralized Integrated TB/HIV Care

Most participants had a successful TB treatment and ART outcome, but optimal adherence was more common for TB treatment than ART (84.6% vs 76.1%) (Table 2). Among those initiating ART, the median CD4 count increase was 101 cells per cubic millimeter (IQR, 46–167). Only 5 patients experienced a possible IRIS event, and 2 of these occurred in patients with CD4 count <50 cells per cubic millimeter. Although almost all (96.1%) reported at least one side effect of TB or ART medications, severe side effects were rare with grade 3 side effects in 23 (4.5%) patients and no grade 4 side effects.

Table 2
Table 2
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Overall, 44 patients died during TB treatment after a median of 59 days (IQR, 39–102). Median baseline CD4 count among those who died was 108 cells per cubic millimeter (IQR, 43–239), and the majority of deaths (63.6%) occurred in patients not on ART. One patient died with drug-resistant TB. Cumulative mortality during TB treatment was strongly determined by CD4 count: 21.0% in CD4 stratum <50 cells per cubic millimeter, 16.0% in CD4 count 50–99, 4.7% in CD4 count 100–199, 6.7% in CD4 count 200–350, and 5.4% in CD4 stratum >350 cells per cubic millimeter (Fig. 2B). Cumulative mortality among those with baseline CD4 count <50 cells per cubic millimeter was higher than that in any other CD4 count stratum (P < 0.0001).

Figure 2
Figure 2
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Among ITART participants, walking to clinic (adj-HR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.21 to 0.86), higher CD4 count per 100 cells per cubic millimeter (adj-HR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.50 to 0.82), and ART during TB treatment (adj-HR: 0.09, 95% CI: 0.04 to 0.19) were independently associated with lower mortality (Table 3). Female gender tended to be associated with lower mortality (HR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.31 to 1.02) and extrapulmonary TB (HR: 1.74, 95% CI: 0.91 to 3.32) and being underweight (HR: 1.82, 95% CI: 0.95 to 3.47) with higher mortality in bivariate but not multivariate analysis.

Table 3
Table 3
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Overall cumulative mortality during TB treatment among 513 HIV-infected ITART patients was lower than among 373 HIV-infected patients in the historical cohort (9.8% vs 20.1%, P < 0.0003) but higher than the mortality observed among 3577 HIV-negative patients in the historical cohort (9.8% vs 6.3%, P = 0.04) (Fig. 2A). During TB treatment, cumulative mortality among ITART patients with CD4 count >100 cells per cubic millimeter was similar to the mortality observed in HIV-negative TB patients (5.6% vs 6.3%, P = 0.65).

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DISCUSSION

Our findings demonstrate that nurse-centered, integrated, CD4-stratified ART initiation at primary care level is effective in increasing ART uptake and reducing mortality but may not be adequate to prevent mortality among TB patients presenting with severe immunosuppression.

Uptake of ART among HIV-infected TB patients increased from 16.6% during the referral for ART model to 69% during the integrated model. High uptake rates have also been observed in other settings implementing TB/HIV integration.16,17 ART adherence was lower compared with TB treatment adherence (84.6% vs 76.1%), possibly because of the monthly (ART) vs weekly (TB) distribution of drugs during the continuation phase of TB treatment. Program harmonization, with ART and TB drugs distributed together, may further improve adherence in this population.

Primary care nurses correctly implemented the CD4-stratified timing of ART initiation for the majority of patients, with 76% of those eligible at month 1 of TB treatment starting at a median of 35 days and 86% of those eligible at month 2 starting ART at a median of 63 days. In contrast, ART initiation among those with CD4 count >350 cells per cubic millimeter at baseline was suboptimal, with only 69% being reassessed by CD4 count before the end of TB treatment and 36% of those eligible initiating ART.

Nurse decision making on ART initiation was validated by physicians in nearly all patients, supporting task shifting as a strategy to deliver integrated TB/HIV care at primary care. This is similar to findings in rural Uganda where nurses demonstrated strong agreement with physicians in deciding whether to initiate ART in patients without TB.18 Our results also expand the findings of RCTs and observational studies of task shifting in general HIV care clinics to TB patients at primary care level in extremely resource-limited settings.10,11,19–26

Mortality during TB treatment was relatively low in our study population and dropped from 20.1% during the referral for ART period to 9.8% during the fully integrated HIV/TB program. The overall 9.8% cumulative mortality during TB treatment was comparable with that reported at integrated clinics in Kenya (6.8%) and South Africa (8.0%–9%).16,17,27 Among ITART participants, walking to clinic (adj-HR: 0.42), higher CD4 count per 100 cells per cubic millimeter (adj-HR: 0.64), and ART during TB treatment (adj-HR: 0.09) were independently associated with lower mortality.

Mortality was disproportionately high (18.8%) in patients with CD4 count <100 cells per cubic millimeter, despite prioritizing this population for early ART initiation at 1 month after the start of TB treatment. Findings from RCTs suggest that starting ART in individuals with CD4 count <50 cells per cubic millimeter at 1 month of TB treatment may be too late.6,7 Our findings support the WHO recommendation that ART should be initiated as an emergency, within the first 2 weeks of TB treatment, in people with CD4 count <50.28 A recent study in South Africa found that most patients on ART in whom M. tuberculosis is detected on autopsy have additional comorbidities contributing to the cause of death, including bacterial infections, fungal infections, neoplasm, and noninfectious organ failure.29 Similarly, studies of cause of death among TB patients with low CD4 count in Thailand found that about 15% of deaths are caused by conditions other than TB, including bacterial infection, liver disease, and Stevens–Johnson syndrome.30,31 This suggests that the management of TB patients with severe immunosuppression may require resources and clinical expertise beyond those available at primary care. Future research is needed to determine whether ART initiation at primary care is effective for this population, whether immediate ART needs to be combined with additional interventions such as broad spectrum antibiotics other than or in addition to co-trimoxazole, or whether referral to higher level care settings is needed for all TB patients with severe immunosuppression presenting at primary care clinics in resource-limited settings.

Despite delayed initiation of ART in patients with CD4 count >100 cells per cubic millimeter, mortality was relatively low in this group and approached the mortality observed among HIV-negative patients with TB. This suggests that ART may not need to be initiated as soon as possible in this population. Initiation of ART at the start of the continuation phase of treatment for ambulatory patients with CD4 count >100 cells per cubic millimeter may be a simple, safe, and effective strategy. This pragmatic strategy could reduce the complexity of patient management at primary care,4 as it allows patients to stabilize clinically, provides time to prepare patients for lifelong ART, reduces the risk of IRIS which has been shown to be highest in patients started on ART immediately after the start of TB treatment,5,7,32 reduces the pill burden from 7 to 5 drugs, and reduces the risk of overlapping toxicity which is highest in the first weeks of treatment initiation.33

Delaying ART in patients with CD4 count >350 cells per cubic millimeter beyond the start of the continuation phase was counterproductive given the poor fidelity of health-care workers to reassess ART eligibility before the end of treatment and low rates of ART initiation in those who become eligible at TB treatment completion. This finding is consistent with evidence from the Starting Antiretroviral Therapy at Three Points in Tuberculosis RCT study, which found that deferring ART beyond the period of TB treatment significantly increased mortality.34

Our study had several limitations that must be considered in interpretation of the findings. First, our study was observational, using a historical cohort for comparison. Differences in ART uptake or mortality could therefore have been influenced by factors other than the intervention, including increase in resources and infrastructure for HIV care and treatment. Second, viral load data were not available to assess effectiveness of ART or validate self-reported adherence data. Third, overall mortality among patients with TB/HIV may have been underestimated as patients may have died before study enrollment, during the TB diagnostic process, or between TB and HIV diagnoses.

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CONCLUSIONS

A crucial question in managing HIV-infected TB patients concerns when and how to initiate ART. Although findings of RCTs have provided key evidence for policy and guidelines, it is important to acknowledge that they were carried out under highly controlled conditions and provided results that were only conclusive for TB patients with CD4 count <50 cells per cubic millimeter.4 Our study expands the clinical trial evidence and translates findings to a real-world, highly resource-deprived setting. We show that CD4-stratified ART initiation by primary care nurses is feasible and associated with increased ART uptake and decreased mortality. In our setting, initiating ART in patients with CD4 counts >100 cells per cubic millimeter at the start of the continuation phase of TB treatment was safe and could help reduce the complexity of TB/HIV care that has been associated with initiation of ART soon after the start of TB treatment.4 Delaying ART beyond the continuation phase among patients with CD4 counts >350 was not a successful strategy as most of these patients were never reassessed for ART eligibility or were assessed but never initiated ART. Further research is needed to determine the optimal management at primary care level of TB patients with CD4 counts <100 cells per cubic millmeter, as mortality in this group remained disproportionately high despite prioritization for early ART.

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The authors are grateful for the patient care, program administration, and coordination contributions of Drs. Roger, Kitenge, Bisuta, Bandale, Nzungani, Kapembi, Mbenza, and Seladi.

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Delayed antiretroviral therapy despite integrated treatment for tuberculosis and HIV infection
Patel, MR; Nana, M; Yotebieng, M; Tabala, M; Behets, F; Van Rie, A
International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 18(6): 694-699.
10.5588/ijtld.13.0807
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Keywords:

antiretroviral therapy; tuberculosis; integration; timing; delay; nurses

© 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

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