Management of Fever in Ambulatory HIV-Infected Adults in Resource-Limited Settings: Prospective Observational Evaluation of a New Mozambican Guideline

Brentlinger, Paula E. MD, MPH*; Silva, Wilson P. PhD*,‡; Buene, Manuel BS*; Morais, Luis MS*; Valverde, Emilio MD, PhD*; Vermund, Sten H. MD, PhD*,†; Moon, Troy D. MD, MPH*,†

Erratum

In the article by Brentlinger et al., appearing in JAIDS: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (Vol. 67, No. 3, pp. 304-309), entitled “Management of Fever in Ambulatory HIV-Infected Adults in Resource-Limited Settings: Prospective Observational Evaluation of a New Mozambican Guideline,” there is an error in the authors’ affiliations. Drs. Moon and Vermund are affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University, not with the Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology.

JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 67(5):e145, December 15, 2014.

JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes: 1 November 2014 - Volume 67 - Issue 3 - p 304–309
doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000304
Brief Report: Clinical Science

Abstract: A new Mozambican guideline for management of fever in HIV-infected adults requires malaria testing and systematic consideration of specific alternative diagnoses (eg, tuberculosis and bacterial infections) in addition to malaria. We conducted a prospective observational study of the guideline's performance. Of 258 HIV-infected subjects with axillary temperature ≥37.5° C or history of fever, 76.0% improved, 13.6% died or were hospitalized, and 10.5% were lost to follow-up. In multivariate analyses, factors associated with adverse outcomes were bacterial blood stream infection, syndromically diagnosed tuberculosis, lower CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, no antiretroviral therapy, lower body mass index, lower hemoglobin, and nonprescription of antibiotics.

*Friends in Global Health, LLC, Maputo, Mozambique;

Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Nashville, TN; and

Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN.

Correspondence to: Paula E. Brentlinger, MD, MPH, Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, 2525 West End Avenue, Suite 750, Nashville, TN 37203 (e-mail: brentp2@u.washington.edu).

Supported by the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention under the terms of Cooperative Agreement U2GPS000631 to Vanderbilt University. The REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture; http://www.project-redcap.org/) online database that we used for initial data entry and management was supported by grant number UL1 TR000445 from NCATS/NIH.

Presented in part at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, May 3–6, 2013, Atlanta, GA, Abstract #876.

The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the National Institutes of Health.

Conception and design: P.E.B., T.D.M., W.P.S., E.V., S.H.V.; acquisition of data: P.E.B., M.B., T.D.M., L.M., W.P.S., E.V.; analysis and interpretation of data: P.E.B., T.D.M., W.P.S., E.V.; drafting of manuscript: P.E.B., T.D.M., S.H.V.; and critical revision and approval of manuscript: All.

Received February 14, 2014

Accepted July 01, 2014

© 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins