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JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes:
doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000015
Clinical Science

Long-Term Follow-Up of Children in the HIVNET 012 Perinatal HIV Prevention Trial: Five-Year Growth and Survival

Owor, Maxensia MBchB*; Mwatha, Anthony MS; Donnell, Deborah PhD; Musoke, Philippa MBchB*,‡; Mmiro, Francis MBchB, FRCOG*; Allen, Melissa MPH§; Jackson, J. Brooks MD, MBA; Fowler, Mary Glenn MD, MPH; Guay, Laura A. MD

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Objectives: To describe 5-year growth, survival, and long-term safety among children exposed to nevirapine or zidovudine in an African perinatal prevention trial, HIVNET 012.

Methods: All study children who were alive at the age 18 months were eligible for an extended follow-up study. Children whose families consented were enrolled and evaluated every 6 months from 24 to 60 months. At each visit, history, physical examination, and growth measures were taken. From these measurements, Z scores based on World Health Organization (WHO) standards were computed. Serious adverse event data were collected. Data from the initial and extended follow-up cohorts were included in the analysis.

Results: Five hundred twenty-eight study children were alive at the age 18 months, and 491 (426 HIV uninfected and 65 infected) were enrolled into the follow-up study. Both exposed but uninfected children and HIV-infected children were substantially below WHO growth standards for weight and height. Head circumference Z scores for uninfected children were comparable with WHO norms. Five-year survival rates were 93% for uninfected children versus 43% for infected children. Long-term safety and growth outcomes in the 2 study arms were similar.

Conclusions: Both infected and uninfected children in the 5-year HIVNET 012 follow-up showed poor height and weight growth outcomes, underscoring the need for early nutritional interventions to improve long-term growth of all infants born to HIV-infected women in resource-limited settings. Similarly, the low 5-year survival among HIV-infected children support the importance of early initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Both peripartum nevirapine and zidovudine were safe.

© 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins


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