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Anal Sex Role Segregation and Versatility Among Men Who Have Sex With Men: EXPLORE Study

Tieu, Hong-Van MD, MS*,†; Li, Xin MS, PhD; Donnell, Deborah PhD; Vittinghoff, Eric PhD§; Buchbinder, Susan MD; Parente, Zachary G. BA*; Koblin, Beryl PhD*

JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes: 1 September 2013 - Volume 64 - Issue 1 - p 121–125
doi: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e318299cede
Brief Report: Epidemiology and Prevention

Abstract: Anal sex role patterns and correlates during unprotected anal sex were examined longitudinally among HIV-negative men who have sex with men. Nearly 9.6% were exclusively receptive, 16.7% exclusively insertive, and 63.0% versatile. Versatility was more likely with primary and HIV-negative/unknown status partners and among younger men and substance users but less likely among Blacks and with higher number of partners. Exclusively receptive role was more likely with HIV-negative/unknown status partners and among younger men and substance users but less likely with higher number of partners. Examining anal sex role patterns helps understand the factors that drive the epidemic among men who have sex with men.

*Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention, Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, New York Blood Center, New York, NY;

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY;

Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA;

§Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA; and

HIV Research Section, San Francisco Department of Health, San Francisco, CA.

Correspondence to: Hong Van Tieu, MD, MS, Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention, Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, New York Blood Center, 310 E. 67th Street Suite 3-110, New York, NY 10065 (e-mail: htieu@nybloodcenter.org).

The authors have no funding or conflicts of interest to disclose.

H.V.T was supported by K01 DA031035. The EXPLORE study was supported by the HIV Network for Prevention Trials and sponsored by the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism through contract N01 AI35176 with Abt Associates, Inc.; contract N01 AI45200 with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; and subcontracts with the Denver Department of Health and Hospitals, the Fenway Community Health Center, the Howard Brown Health Center, the New York Blood Center, the Public Health Foundation, Inc., and the University of Washington. In addition, the EXPLORE study was supported by the HIV Prevention Trials Network and sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Office of AIDS Research through a cooperative agreement with Family Health International (cooperative agreement 5 U01 AI46749) with a subsequent subcontract to Abt Associates, Inc. with subcontracts to the Howard Brown Health Center and the Denver Department of Health and Hospitals, cooperative agreement U01AI48040 to the Fenway Community Health Center, cooperative agreement U01 AI48016 to Columbia University (including a subagreement with the New York Blood Center), cooperative agreement U01 AI47981 to the University of Washington, cooperative agreement U01 AI47995 to the University of California, San Francisco.

Received December 05, 2012

Accepted April 26, 2013

© 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins