Skip Navigation LinksHome > April 15, 2013 - Volume 62 - Issue 5 > Antiretroviral Therapy Initiated During Acute HIV Infection...
JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes:
doi: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e318285cd33
Brief Report: Basic and Translational Science

Antiretroviral Therapy Initiated During Acute HIV Infection Fails to Prevent Persistent T-Cell Activation

Vinikoor, Michael J. MD*; Cope, Anna MPH*; Gay, Cynthia L. MD*; Ferrari, Guido MD; McGee, Kara S. MSPH; Kuruc, Joann D. BSN*; Lennox, Jeffrey L. MD§; Margolis, David M. MD*; Hicks, Charles B. MD; Eron, Joseph J. MD*

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Abstract

Abstract: Initiation of antiretroviral therapy during acute HIV-1 infection may prevent persistent immune activation. We analyzed longitudinal CD38+HLA-DR+ CD8+ T-cell percentages in 31 acutely infected individuals who started early (median 43 days since infection) and successful antiretroviral therapy, and maintained viral suppression through 96 weeks. Pretherapy a median of 72.6% CD8+ T cells were CD38+HLA-DR+, and although this decreased to 15.6% by 96 weeks, it remained substantially higher than seronegative controls (median 8.9%, P = 0.008). Shorter time to suppression predicted lower activation at 96 weeks. These results support the hypothesis that very early events in HIV-1 pathogenesis may result in prolonged immune dysfunction.

© 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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