You could be reading the full-text of this article now if you...

If you have access to this article through your institution,
you can view this article in

Feasibility of Vagus Nerve StimulationSynchronized Blood Oxygenation LevelDependent Functional MRI

BOHNING, DARYL E. PhD*; LOMAREV, MIKHAIL P. MD, PhD*∥; DENSLOW, STEWART PhD*; NAHAS, ZIAD MD†; SHASTRI, ANANDA PhD* AND; GEORGE, MARK S. MD*†‡§

Investigative Radiology:
Original Investigations
Abstract

Bohning DE, Lomarev MP, Denslow S, et al. Feasibility of vagus nerve stimulation–synchronized blood oxygenation level– dependent functional MRI. Invest Radiol 2001;36:470–479.

rationale and objectives. Left cervical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) by use of an implanted neurocybernetic prosthesis (NCP) system is effective in treating epilepsy, with open data suggesting effectiveness in depression, yet the mechanisms of action are unknown. Our objective was to develop a methodology for performing VNS-synchronized functional magnetic resonance imaging (VNS-fMRI) and then to demonstrate its feasibility for studying VNS effects.

methods. In nine patients implanted for treatment of intractable depression, a Macintosh computer was used to detect the signal from the implanted VNS stimulator and then to synchronize fMRI image acquisition with its regular firing.

results. With our VNS-fMRI methodology, the blood oxygenation level–dependent response to VNS was shown in brain regions regulated by the vagus nerve: orbitofrontal and parieto-occipital cortex bilaterally, left temporal cortex, the hypothalamus, and the left amygdala.

conclusions. Vagus nerve stimulation pulses from an NCP system can be detected externally to determine its firing pattern, thus allowing VNS-fMRI studies of VNS-induced brain activity.

Author Information

From the Center for Advanced Imaging Research, Departments of *Radiology, †Psychiatry, and ‡Neurology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; §Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Hospital, Charleston, South Carolina; and the ∥Institute of the Human Brain, St. Petersburg, Russia.

This work was partially funded by grants from Cyberonics, Inc., and The Dana Foundation (to Dr. Bohning).

Reprint requests: Daryl E. Bohning, PhD, Radiology Department, Medical University of South Carolina, 171 Ashley Ave., Charleston, SC 29425; e-mail: bohninde@musc.edu

Received February 25, 2001, and accepted for publication, after revision, May 4, 2001.

© 2001 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.