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Singing therapy can be effective for a patient with severe nonfluent aphasia

Yamaguchi, Satoshia,b; Akanuma, Kyokoa,b; Hatayama, Yukab; Otera, Masakob; Meguro, Kenichia,b

International Journal of Rehabilitation Research: March 2012 - Volume 35 - Issue 1 - p 78–81
doi: 10.1097/MRR.0b013e32835032f8
Case reports

Patients with severe aphasia are rarely treated using speech therapy. We used music therapy to continue to treat a 79-year-old patient with chronic severe aphasia. Interventions 1, 2, and 3 were to practice singing a song that the patient knew, to practice singing a song with a therapist, and to practice saying a greeting using a song with lyrics, respectively. In addition, practice of uttering names of body parts was initiated using touch and rhythm. After intervention 1, the patient could sing spontaneously and repeat lyrics. After intervention 2, she could sing with the therapist, and sing spontaneously and repeat lyrics. After intervention 3, she could memorize words with meaning, say the words in context, and use them. The patient could utter the names of two body parts after therapy with touch and rhythm. These suggest that rehabilitation therapy can still be used in patients with severe cognitive impairment.

aDepartment of Geriatric Behavioral Neurology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai

bThe Osaki-Tajiri SKIP Center, Osaki, Japan

Correspondence to Kenichi Meguro, MD, Department of Geriatric Behavioral Neurology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, 980-8575 Sendai, Japan Tel: +81 22 717 7359; fax: +81 22 717 7339; e-mail: k-meg@umin.ac.jp

Received September 20, 2011

Accepted December 8, 2011

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.