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Innovations: Technology & Techniques in Cardiothoracic & Vascular Surgery:
ISMICS 2006 Annual Meeting Poster Session: Session 3 - Innovative Techniques and Technologies I

Impact Of Passive Haptic Training On Telemanipulator Performance: P18

Jacobs, Stephan; Holzhey, David; Mohr, Friedrich W.; Falk, Volkmar

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Cardio-Thoracic-Surgery, Heartcenter Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany

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Objective:

The use of a telemanipulator with endoscopic instruments requires special training and surgical performance is associated with a learning curve. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential value of Haptic-Visual over Visual-Only passive Training in Telemanipulator-assisted surgery.

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Methods:

Two Telemanipulator consoles (da Vinci, Intuitive Surgical) were linked through an Application Interface (API) allowing the surgeon at the training console to passively follow the motions of the instructor (Haptic-Visual Learning group, hv). Both the trainee and the instructor shared the same 3D vision. Alternatively, subjects received only standard visual training (Visual-Only Learning group, v). Before starting the trial a standardized demonstration of tasks and the system was given for both groups. Participants (n=20 without previuos experience with telemanipulation per group) performed a set of various tasks in a randomized order. Study endpoints were time and accuracy required to perform the different task.

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Results:

The first task, with moving items to appropriate locations showed no significant differences in the time to perform the task (mean: 2.43min [hv] vs. 3.04min [v]) but accuracy of performance (number of mistakes, number of trials before the task could be accomplished) was enlarged in the visual-only passive learning group with summary: 14.3 [v] vs. 2.4 [hv]. With more challenging tasks (cut off a round figure out off elastic material [cut] and performing double dot suture lines [sti]) the number of mistakes were significantly less in the hv group (summary: 7.6[cut] and 9.9[sti] compared to the v group (summary 16.8[cut] and 24.4[sti]). The time to perform the tasks decreased in the hv group with mean: 5.02min [cut] and 7.11min[sti] compared to the v group with mean: 6.42min[cut] and 9.02min[sti].

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Conclusion:

This study demonstrated the impact of haptic-visual passive learning in computer-assisted surgery.

© 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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